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Neighborhood types

Cluster analysis of the four dimensions underlying the 33 variables yielded fourteen neighborhood types. For each neighborhood type, the following list includes:

The fourteen neigborhood types are as follows:

1. (32.7 40.3 43.2 48.6). VUrPoNa. Very non-suburban, impoverished, non-linguistically-isolated/Hispanic. The core African-American neighborhoods of the South and West Sides. Nearly two standard deviations below the mean on non-suburban (dimension 1).

2. (30.3 38.7 43.1 65.3). VUrVPoNaVFa. Very non-suburban, very impoverished, non-linguistically-isolated/Hispanic, with a high concentration of young families. Mostly African-American neighborhoods on the edge of type-1 neighborhoods. Nearly two standard deviations from the mean on non-suburban (dimension 1).

3. (45.7 45.8 44.1 45.5). Na. Non-linguistically-isolated/Hispanic, with just slightly below average scores on the other dimensions. Mostly middle-class African-American neighborhoods on the Far South Side and in Gary.

4. (47.6 43.5 45.5 62.0). PoVFa. Impoverished, with a very high concentration of young families. Mostly found along the southern and western edges of the City of Chicago, in Maywood and in Belwood, and in the older suburban central places.

5. (48.0 47.2 59.6 44.7). IsNo. Linguistically-isolated/Hispanic, with few young families. Largely Hispanic or immigrant neighborhoods toward the edge of the City or in the suburbs.

6. (45.5 42.1 66.6 59.6). VIsFa. Very linguistically-isolated/Hispanic, with a high concentration of young families. Hispanic neighborhoods for the most part, including several in older suburban central places like Waukegan, Elgin, Aurora, and Joliet.

7. (42.6 44.6 72.3 50.5). UrPoVIs. Non-suburban, impoverished, very linguistically-isolated/Hispanic. Mostly Hispanic neighborhoods away from the core Hispanic areas. More than two standard deviations above the mean on linguistically-isolated/Hispanic (dimension 3).

8. (42.5 39.6 81.9 67.0). UrVPoVIsVFa. Non-suburban, very impoverished, very linguistically-isolated/Hispanic, with a very high concentration of young families. The core Hispanic areas: Little Village and parts of Humboldt Park. More than three standard deviations above the mean on linguistically-isolated/Hispanic (dimension 3).

9. (41.9 65.1 48.9 33.2). UrVWeVNo. Non-suburban, very well-off, with very few young families. Prosperous inner-city areas with "professional" populations. The North Side Lakefront, Hyde Park, parts of Evanston, and Oak Park, and a few outlying suburban apartment districts.

10. (55.5 49.8 49.1 39.0). SuVNo. Suburban, with very few young families. Neighborhoods of average wealth at the edge of the city or in the inner suburbs, with few children and an aging population.

11. (57.9 47.3 45.3 49.7). Su. Suburban, with just slightly below-average scores on the other dimensions. Suburban neighborhoods of no great distinctiveness.

14. (60.0 57.1 45.2 58.6). SuWeFa. Suburban, well-off, with a high concentration of young families. Classic prosperous suburbia, now mostly in the middle and outer suburbs.

16. (57.5 59.2 46.7 46.0). SuWe. Suburban, well-off. Prosperous suburbia with fewer young families than average. Typically a bit closer to and mostly north and west of the City.

17. (58.8 76.6 45.8 49.4). SuVWe. Suburban, very well-off. Old-line wealthy suburbs, largely in northern Cook and southern Lake Counties (plus a couple of tiny curious outliers in Hyde Park and Lincoln Park). More than two and a half standard deviations above the mean on wealth (dimension 2).