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Optional Draft Review Service

The Autumn 2014 deadline for requesting a draft review is Wednesday, October 29, at 4:30 p.m. when the Dissertation Office closes. We are happy to respond to your questions at any time, but we do not review late drafts and we do not review more than one version of a draft.

The Draft Review

The turn-around time for a draft review is usually within two weeks.  We review drafts on a first-come, first-served basis.

Follow the steps below to ask us to review a draft of your dissertation.

  1. Format your dissertation draft according to the University-Wide Requirements for the Ph.D. Dissertation.
  2. Create an account on the ETD Administrator.
  3. Begin the About my dissertation/thesis step to enter details (title, department, etc.) in the Dissertation/Thesis details section. Use headline style to enter your title.  Your name should match the name in your official University records and on your title page.
  4. Upload your draft as a PDF in the PDF section. (You can upload a revised PDF later. You will not need to create a new submission.)
  5. Do not complete the Submission steps until you have completed editing your dissertation and have uploaded your final version.
  6. Contact us via the Ask the Dissertation Office form. We will use the email address you provide on the form to get back to you.
  7. We will respond shortly after we receive your draft review request, usually within 24 hours. Let us know right away if you do not receive our initial response acknowledging your request.
  8. We will send comments on your draft within a week or two. You should keep an eye on your junk mail in case our messages are filtered out as spam.

A draft review is helpful but not comprehensive; we do not edit dissertations. Our goal is to be sure you are on the right track with the formatting and submission process. We want to help you understand the basic requirements so that you can check your final PDF yourself and graduate as planned. It is your responsibility to follow the requirements consistently in your final dissertation.