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University of Chicago Library

Guide to the Norman S. Hayner Papers 1921-1922

© 2006 University of Chicago Library

Acknowledgments

Descriptive Summary

Title:

Hayner, Norman S.. Papers

Dates:

1921-1922

Size:

0.25 linear feet (1 box)

Repository:

Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library
1100 East 57th Street
Chicago, Illinois 60637 U.S.A.

Abstract:

Norman S. Hayner, Sociologist. The Norman S. Hayner Papers contain copies of diary entries made by Hayner between January 1, 1921 and September 13, 1922.

Information on Use

Access

No restrictions.

Citation

When quoting material from this collection, the preferred citation is: Hayner, Norman S.. Papers, [Box #, Folder #], Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library

Biographical Note

Norman Sylvester Hayner (1896-1977) took his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Chicago in 1923.

Born in Peking, China, the son of Methodist Missionaries, Hayner graduated from the University of Washington (A. B., 1920) after having served in the Army in France during World War I. He came to the University of Chicago in 1920, studying primarily with Robert Park and Ernest Burgess. His dissertation, "The Hotel: The Sociology of Hotel Life," was later (1936) published by the University of North Carolina Press. From 1925 until his death, Hayner taught sociology at the University of Washington, where his research focused on crime and comparative penology, family patterns, and urban society in Mexico.

Scope Note

The Norman S. Hayner Papers contain copies of diary entries made by Hayner between January 1, 1921 and September 13, 1922.

Hayner's diary of his first two years in graduate school at Chicago provides a dairy account of Hayner's readings, reflections, courses, instructors, and other activities. Conferences with Park, lectures by George Herbert Mead, meetings of the Sociology Club, discussions with fellow graduate students such as Nels Anderson, sermons and lectures by various ministers, and interviews conducted for his doctoral dissertation, are examples of the subjects on which the diary touches. Like many early American sociologists, Hayner was deeply religious, and his diary casts an intimate light on the relationship between his religious beliefs and professional training.

Related Resources

The following related resources are located in the Department of Special Collections:

http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/spcl/select.html

Subject Headings

INVENTORY

Box 1   Folder 1

January 1, 1921 - April 30, 1921 January 1, 1922 - April 29, 1922

Box 1   Folder 2

May 1, 1921 - September 13, 1921 April 30, 1922 - September 13, 1922

Box 1   Folder 3

September 14, 1921 - December 31, 1921