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University of Chicago Library

Guide to the Michael Polanyi Papers 1900-1975

© 2009 University of Chicago Library

Descriptive Summary

Title:

Polanyi, Michael. Papers

Dates:

1900-1975

Size:

30 linear feet (60 boxes)

Repository:

Special Collections Research Center
University of Chicago Library
1100 East 57th Street
Chicago, Illinois 60637 U.S.A.

Abstract:

Michael Polanyi, chemist and philosopher, was born, Budapest, Hungary, 1891. He received his M.D. (1913) and Ph.D (1917) from the University of Budapest. He worked at Kaiser Wilhelm Institute of Fibre Chemistry, Berlin, 1920 to 1923, and the Institute of Physical and Electro-Chemistry, Berlin, 1923 to 1933. He was chair of physical chemistry, 1933 to 1948, and professor of social studies, 1948-58, at the University of Manchester. Polanyi was senior research fellow, Merton College, Oxford, from 1958 to 1976. Died, 1976. The papers of Michael Polanyi contains personal and professional correspondence; research notes; manuscripts of lectures, published and unpublished works, speeches, German scientific writings, patents, and poetry; diaries and notebooks; offprints; and memorabilia, including photographs, clippings, a sound recording of an interview with Polanyi, Christmas cards, and invitations. Also includes photocopies of title pages of the 1,500 books from Polanyi's library. Correspondents include Joseph Oldham, Marjorie Grene, Harry Prosch, Arthur Koestler, Karl Mannheim, Edward Shils, and Eugene Wigner. Manuscripts and correspondence reveal the range of Polanyi's philosophical thought and interests in intellectual liberty and the issue of planning in science. Correspondence also illustrates Polanyi's participation in the organization of the Congress for Cultural Freedom and the Committee on Science and Freedom.

Information on Use

Access

The collection is open to research.

Citation

When quoting material from this collection, the preferred citation is: Polanyi, Michael. Papers, [Box #, Folder #], Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library

Biographical Note

Michael Polanyi was born in Budapest in 1891, and though his career as a scientist and philosopher led him far from his native Hungary, the intellectual milieu of his childhood remained a life-long influence on his work. His father was an engineer and businessman and his Russian mother, Cecile, wrote a fashion column for the German-language newspaper in Budapest. Throughout the early years of Polanyi's childhood, the family was financially successful, but most of their resources were lost before the first World War, leaving the children largely dependent on Polanyi's brother Karl for support. Despite this poor financial situation, Cecile Polanyi maintained a salon for Hungarian literary figures.

Polanyi grew up in a literate, political world. With his brother Karl and friend Oscar Jászi, a young Polanyi helped to found the Galilei Circle, a Hungarian nationalist group which promoted Hungarian cultural traditions and worked for an independent Hungarian state. Polanyi became a Doctor of Medicine at Budapest University in 1913 and served as a medical officer in the Austro-Hungarian army during World War I. His earliest scientific paper, "Chemistry of Hydrocephalic Liquid," was published at age 19. Throughout the war, he worked on the application of quantum theory to the third law of thermodynamics and on the thermodynamics of adsorption. In 1916, he published his work on adsorption, one of the first of over two hundred scientific papers he was to publish before his move into philosophy in 1948. His theory of adsorption was accepted by the chemistry faculty of Budapest University which awarded him a Ph.D. in 1917.

Following the war, in the autumn of 1920, Polanyi received an appointment to the new Institute of Fibre Chemistry in Berlin, part of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute. His early years in Berlin are recounted in the 1962 essay, My Time with X-Rays and Crystals. Fritz Haber, the Director of the prestigious Institute of Physical Chemistry, sent Polanyi off to expand his laboratory skills in order to achieve full acceptance by the German scientific community. He succeeded in this with a study of x-ray diffraction of cellulose fibers, and in 1923 he was appointed to the Institute of Physical Chemistry to work under Haber. During the following ten years in Berlin, Polanyi established himself as one of Germany's leading physical chemists. He worked with some of the most prominent scientists of the age, including Eugene Wigner with whom he was to share a life-long friendship.

For Polanyi, who was a Jew, the coming to power of Hitler and the National Socialist Party marked the end of his career in Germany. In 1933, prompted by repeated attacks on Jewish intellectuals, Polanyi accepted a chair in physical chemistry created for him at the University of Manchester. He continued with the chemical studies begun in Berlin, and his laboratory at Manchester attracted students and established scientists from all over the world. His contacts with non-refugee German scientists decreased, but from 1933 to 1948 (the year Polanyi accepted the chair of Social Studies at Manchester), his contacts with British scientists increased, and eventually included William H. Bragg and his son William L. Bragg, Arthur Allmand, Patrick Blackett, Christopher Ingold, Cyril Hinshelwood, and Eric Rideal. There are a number of exchanges from this period with Max Born and Erwin Schrödinger, but perhaps his most important associate during this period was Japanese chemist Juro Horiuchi.

During these first years in England, Polanyi turned his interest to the philosophical attack presented free societies by the totalitarian governments of Germany and Russia. In 1935, he published his first non-scientific work, "U.S.S.R. Economics—Fundamental Data System and Spirit." This was accompanied by a film which criticized the system of Soviet economics as an attack on liberty. While devoting most of his time to scientific pursuits, Polanyi spent part of the next five years in work on The Contempt of Freedom (1940), his large-scale critique of totalitarian government. In the early 1930s, Polanyi had visited the Soviet Union and had become friends with two Soviet chemists, Alexander Frumkin and Nicolai Semenoff. Both were to write him asking that he stop his attacks on Soviet economic policies.

A devoted Keynesian, Polanyi's writings on economic subjects are divided between attacks on the Soviet system and lucid commentaries on the work of Lord Keynes. Between 1935 and c1950, Polanyi corresponded with a number of important economists including Friedrich A. Hayek, David Caradog Jones, Wolfe Mays, and John Maynard Keynes. His position as a scientist and a social thinker led him to become involved with a group of intellectuals in England concerned with social problems. This group, the Moot, was convened by Joseph H. Oldham, editor of the Christian Newsletter.

The war was passed in divided intellectual pursuits. Polanyi continued his scientific studies and tried to obtain military projects through Sir William Lawrence Bragg. At the same time he wrote on economic subjects. It was during these years that he helped to found, with John R. Baker, the Society for Freedom in Science which he used as a forum for developing his ideas on scientific liberty.

The philosophic ideas of Michael Polanyi first took characteristic shape during the war years. His opposition of planning in science led to an epistemology of science grounded in a belief in an individual nature of discovery, unhindered by official or dogmatic interference. In 1945, Polanyi published Science, Faith and Society, his first large-scale philosophic work and the foundation for his theory of knowledge. The evolution of Polanyi's thought is traceable in the Papers through a number of manuscripts, beginning with his 1936 On Truth, On Reason and Science and Liberty and continuing with his studies of scientific planning throughout the late 1930s and early 1940s. By 1950, the date of the first of his University of Chicago lecture series, The Logic of Liberty, his interest in philosophy dominated all other intellectual concerns.

In 1951, Polanyi was offered a position at the University of Chicago on the Committee on Social Thought and was awarded a large grant by the Rockefeller Foundation. The State Department, however, held up his immigrant visa under the McCarran Act until Polanyi withdrew it, consequently remaining in Manchester. He was suspected of past involvement in a subversive organization, the Galilei Circle of his Hungarian youth. Ironically, he was involved with the most significant intellectual anti-Communist force in post-war Europe, the Congress for Cultural Freedom. When Princeton University made Polanyi an honorary Doctor of Science during its 1949 bicentennial celebration, he was cited as "a veteran campaigner against those who would take from science the freedom she requires for the pursuit of truth." His book, The Logic of Liberty, 1950, would continue his attack on Soviet infringement of personal liberty begun nearly twenty years before.

Following this debacle, Polanyi became a regular visitor to the United States and the University of Chicago. Two of his lecture series here were ultimately published as The Logic of Liberty (1950) and Meaning (1936). Between 1951 and 1958, when he retired from Manchester to accept a position of senior research fellow at Merton College, Oxford, Polanyi wrote his central philosophical work, Personal Knowledge. Personal Knowledge grew out of Polanyi's 1951 Gifford lectures.

Another aspect of Michael Polanyi's life, political involvement, can be traced throughout the collection. Prominence as a scientist and anti-Communist social thinker led Polanyi to recognition as an important commentator on current affairs. Throughout World War II, his letters, articles, and reviews appeared in various British journals, particularly the Manchester Guardian.

Polanyi was a major figure in the debate over intellectual liberty and most particularly the issue of planning in science. He was co-founder with John R. Baker of the Society for Freedom in Science in 1941. In the post-war period, Polanyi was an active participant in the organization of the Congress for Cultural Freedom and its English affiliate, the Committee on Science and Freedom. His close involvement with these organizations is best illustrated in the correspondence through exchanges with such figures as Raymond Aron, Konstantin A. Jelenski, Shepard Stone, and Michael Josselson.

By 1972, age and infirmity had slowed Professor Polanyi's work. His final years were spent at home in Oxford and in a Northampton nursing home. During this period, Polanyi's wife of fifty-six years, Magda Kemeney Polanyi, managed his affairs. She supervised the translation of Personal Knowledge into German and was responsible for decisions concerning the disposition of Professor Polanyi's papers and library. Michael Polanyi died in the hospital at Northampton on February 22, 1976. He was eighty-four.

Scope Note

The papers of Michael Polanyi are a continuing testament to the richness of the philosopher's life. In order to facilitate an understanding of the evolving nature of Michael Polanyi's career, the papers have been divided into four basic series and organized in a largely chronological framework: Correspondence (Boxes 1-20); Notes (Boxes 21-25, folder 7); Manuscripts (25:8-44:11); and Offprints and Memorabilia (45-60).

When received, correspondence, manuscripts, notes, and memorabilia had already been sorted by Professor Polanyi's secretary. The correspondence had been arranged alphabetically in yearly files from 1950 to 1975. Earlier correspondence had been grouped together in no particular order. Professor Polanyi's manuscripts were likewise ordered chronologically and labeled by the title given a particular document at the time of its composition and not necessarily by its final title at the time of publication or delivery as a lecture. The notes were segregated into files arranged alphabetically by author and there were several folders of notes labeled "miscellaneous." Memorabilia was scattered throughout the collection in folders of clippings, photographs, and unorganized announcements, invitations and the like. In addition to these relatively clear groupings, a good deal of overlap occurred with notes and letters scattered among the manuscripts. Letters and clippings from Polanyi's mother Cecile had been separately filed. These items (Boxes 18-20) have been separated but not further organized.

The original organization has been largely retained. Correspondence is interfiled chronologically with separate categories for certain specific people and organizations. The letters and manuscripts relating to Polanyi's involvement with John R. Baker and the Society for Freedom in Science and Joseph H. Oldham and the Moot are separate as are letters to and from his close friends and colleagues Marjorie Grene and Harry Prosch. Most of the family correspondence has been interfiled, but there is a box of letters from his brother Karl Polanyi and Karl's wife Ilona which covers over fifty years of family history. All the sections of correspondence are filed chronologically with undated and fragmentary letters arranged alphabetically at the end of the series. The correspondence contains letters to Polanyi as well as copies of letters he sent out. An index of selected names has been prepared which lists his correspondence with significant figures in twentieth-century history and scholarship.

During the course of World War II, Polanyi lost contact with many friends and family on the continent. Correspondence during the early war years, 1939 and 1940, is filled with pleas for assistance from loved ones trapped in occupied lands (3:14-4:5). Polanyi was instrumental in bringing his brothers Karl and Adolf and his sisters Laura and Irene to England (17:9).

Correspondence with Dr. Oldham and papers presented at meetings of the Moot have been grouped together in this collection (15:3-10). Polanyi corresponded independently with two significant members of the Moot, T. S. Eliot and Karl Mannheim. Their letters will be found in the correspondence.

One of the most significant influences on the development of Polanyi's thought was the correspondence he shared with his friend and colleague, philosopher Marjorie Grene. This material has been grouped together (19:1-9), but it contains only two letters which predate Personal Knowledge.

Manuscripts in the collection are also arranged chronologically by date of composition. Their order has been determined by the dates ascribed to them by Polanyi when they were originally filed. Thus, a revised version of a paper will generally fall under the year of its revision and not the year of its composition. Exceptions to this ordering occur with manuscripts composed at an earlier period and drawn together for a lecture series. Such manuscripts have been filed by the dates of their lectures. Titles and descriptions of manuscripts are taken from the text and have not been matched with any bibliography of Polanyi's published writings. It is hoped that this approach, respecting the integrity of Polanyi's original organization and titles, will help to illuminate the evolving nature of his thought.

The manuscripts series jumps from a solid collection of pre-1952 manuscripts to an equally large group of post-1960 manuscripts. This leaves the researcher with sources for the foundation and later developments of Polanyi's thought, but without sources for the work which culminates in Personal Knowledge.

In spite of this lack of early material relating to Polanyi's philosophical thought, later correspondence with Marjorie Grene and others is abundant. Polanyi's thought ranged over a multitude of ideas and disciplines. His views on the mind led to correspondence with Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow and Erik Erikson; his views on language, with Noam Chomsky and Yehoshua Bar-Hillel; on visual perception, with Maurice Pirenne. Perhaps the most consistently stimulating exchanges in the collection occur with old friends like Grene, Arthur Koestler, and Eugene Wigner.

The range of Polanyi's thought in his later years was enormous. The Logic of Personal Knowledge, a festschrift presented to Polanyi on his seventieth birthday in 1961, contains essays by such prominent thinkers and friends as Arthur Koestler, Raymond Aron, Bertrand de Jouvenel, and C. V. Wedgwood. After 1960, there are a large number of manuscripts in the collection which help to demonstrate the growth of Polanyi's thought. Of particular interest are the sets of lectures delivered between 1960 and 1971. Included in this group are the 1960 Gunning Lectures, Perceptions of Personal Knowledge (34:1-6); the 1962 Terry Lectures (35:6-12); Man in Thought, a 1964 Duke University lecture series (36:4-37:3); Wesleyan lectures of 1965, Man's Place in the Universe (37:15-38:5); and Meaning, lectures and seminars at the University of Chicago in 1969 (39:6-40:1). The majority of philosophical manuscripts are corrected typescripts of lectures and papers delivered between 1960 and 1972. There are no galley proofs in the collection for any of Polanyi's publications.

Research notes have been divided into two groups: subject and author. The subject notes are drawn together from inter-related material in the folders originally marked "miscellaneous." "Author notes" are an alphabetical arrangement of Polanyi's files of quotations by and comments on a variety of scientific, political, philosophical, and literary figures. The memorabilia in the collection has been separated into the following categories: photographs and postcards; general memorabilia including announcements, addresses, and receipts; clippings, dissertations, and interviews with Polanyi; and offprints and other published materials.

Nearly all of the series of research notes are devoted to philosophy. When received, the notes had been divided between "author notes" and "miscellaneous." The miscellaneous notes have been sorted by subject and inventoried. The author notes have been arranged alphabetically by last name of author. Most of this material contains summaries, commentaries, and quotations relating to the work of a specific author. Together these sets of notes formed a reference file which Polanyi could turn to in writing.

INDEX OF SELECTED CORRESPONDENTS

This index highlights Polanyi's correspondence with a wide range of prominent individuals between 1913 and 1975. The correspondence is arranged chronologically, with undated letters arranged alphabetically at the end of the series. Indexed names are followed by the dates of their correspondence or, if there are undated letters, by the number of pieces followed by n.d. Correspondence of John R. Baker, Joseph H. Oldham, Marjorie Grene, Julius and Elsa Hollo, Harry Prosch, Karl and Ilona Polanyi, and Cecile Polanyi follows the undated group.

Arthur J. Allmand, 1931 July 3. 1932 May 17; June 2, 21; Nov. 29. 1933 Apr. 6; Sept. 8; Dec. 22. 1934 Mar. 22; Apr. 8; Sept. 26; Oct. 2. 1937 Jan. 15; Dec. 28. 1939 May 22, 24. 1941 Mar. 31. 1945 May 13.

Edward N. da Costa Andrade, 1944 Oct. 8, 10.

Raymond Aron, 1961 Mar. 28. 1967 May 9, 31. 1971 June 2. 1972 Sept. 22.

Yehoshua Bar-Hillel 1964 Dec. 15, 30. 1965 Mar. 1. 1966 Mar. 25; Apr. 25.

Paul Beck, 1930 Sept. 4. 1933 June 2; Aug. 4; Oct. 3. 1938 Jan. 15. 1947 Oct. 29. 1948 Jan. 8.

Daniel Bell, 1972 June 1, 15.

Ronald P. Bell, 1947 Dec. 12.

Morroe Berger, 1960 Nov. 15.

Ernst Berl, 1922 Mar. 28; May 2.

Arnold Berliner, 1924 Feb. 7; June 23.

John D. Bernal, 1935 Mar. 26; Apr. 11, 29. 1938 Sept. 10, 13. 1939 Nov. 14. 1946 Jan. 8, 30.

Sir William Beveridge, 1938 Apr. 29. 1939 May 24, 25.

Arthur Binz, 1922 Mar. 7, 8; May 23.

Niels Bjerrum, 1945 Nov. 1; Dec. 27.

Patrick M. Blackett, 1937 July 18. 1938 May 10. 1939 Aug. 26. 1941 Oct. 28; Nov. 3. 1942 Sept. 21, 22. 1944 Nov. 9. 1945 Mar. 9, 13; May 16; June 22, 28; July 27; Aug. 1. 1946 May 10; Dec. 20. 1947 July 11; Sept. 15. 1948 Mar. 16. 1949 May 9.

Max Bodenstein, 1935 June 17. 1937 Sept. 13.

Nils Bohr, 1938 July 8.

Karl F. Bonhoeffer, 1933 July 12. 1938 June 3. 1939 June 16. 1950 Mar. 13.

Max Born, 1921 Jan. 12; June 13; Sept. 26. 1924 July 10. 1936 Feb. 19. 1941 July 29, 31. 1942 Feb. 12, 14, 20; June 30; July 9; Sept. 21, 27; Oct. 5; Nov. 21; Dec. 16.

Sir William Henry Bragg, 1934 June 30; July 2, 6. 1938 Nov. 22. 1939 Jan. 14.

Sir William L. Bragg, 1933 June 30; July 7, 10, 14; Nov. 22. 1942 May 22; Oct. 28; Dec. 14. 1943 Jan. 7; May 22; July 1; Sept. 1, 14, 24, 27. 1946 Jan. 25. 2 n.d.

Georg Bredig, 1913 Feb. 1, 12. 1914 Feb. 16. 1915 Jan. 28; Apr. 25; Dec. 31. 1917 Feb. 12. 1923 June 23. 1924 Feb. 29. 1932 Nov. 18. 1 n.d.

Percy W. Bridgman, 1923 Mar. 24. 1943 Sept. 8. 1946 Dec. 19.

William F. Buckley, 1964 Aug. 4. 1968 Mar. 12, 21; Apr. 11.

Alan Bullock, 1970 Jan. 20, 26.

Hadley Cantril, 1962 July 2. 1964 June 10; July 28; Oct. 26.

Jean-Claude Casanova, 1969 Feb. 13; Mar. 20; June 6; Sept. 26; Oct. 24. 1970 Mar. 10; Nov. 27. 1971 Jan. 22; Apr. 8; June 21, 25.

Noam Chomsky, 1966 Nov. 6.

Jens A. Christiansen, 1932 Nov. 14. 1948 Mar. 1, 10; June 22.

Nevill Coghill, 1963 Oct. 22, 24; 1969 Oct. 22.

John Bell Condliffe, 1940 Sept. 16.

Erika Cremer, 1932 June 17. 1952 July 22.

J. A. Crowther, 1942 Jan. 23.

Lionel Curtis, 1944 Dec. 18, 21. 1945 Jan. 1, 9, 10, 20.

Cyril Darlington, 1962 Aug. 31; Sept. 3.

Frederick G. Donnan, 1932 May 16; Oct. 6. 1933 Jan. 20; Apr. 7, 19. 1941 Dec. 14. 1943 Jan. 29; Sept. 9.

Ludwig Ebert, 1933 July 3.

Paul Ehrenfest, 1932 June 6.

Albert Einstein, 1920 Mar. 1. 1922 Mar. 14. 1932 Oct. 13.

Daniel D. Eley, 1939 Apr. 8; May 9; Dec. 15. 1940 June 6, 11; Oct. 13. 1944 Sept. 7, 30; Oct. 2. 1945 June 4. 1946 Jan. 6. 1947 Jan. 7; Mar. 18. 1974 Jan. 3, 8, 17.

Mircea Eliade, 1969 Jan. 24.

T. S. Eliot, 1944 June 3, 7, 27, 29. 1945 Mar. 5; May 23, 25; Dec. 26.

Pierre Emmanuel, 1967 Oct. 5. 1968 Apr. 9, 25; June 4. 1969 May 2.

Dorothy Emmet, 1947 Sept. 18. 1973 Mar. 27. 5 n.d.

Erik Erikson, 1965 Oct. 28.

Henry Eyring, 1933 Oct. 28. 1934 Nov. 24. 1936 Nov. 6. 1937 Feb. 18; Mar. 23. 1938 Sept. 22. 1951 Mar. 6.

Kasimir Fajans, 1915 May 24; Oct. 3; Dec. 12. 1916 Jan. 13; Mar. 22; May 27; June 28; Oct. 22. 1917 Sept. 2. 1918 Mar. 21; June 26; Oct. 5. 1920 Feb. 3; June 28; Sept. 1; Dec. 31. 1921 Jan. 4; Apr. 4; May 5. 1 n.d.

Herbert Feigl, 1969 Mar. 18, 31.

Laura Fermi, 1966 Oct. 3, 7, 12.

James Franck, 1921 Nov. 17. 1925 July 3. 1927 Apr. 23. 1932 Aug. 30. 1961 May 18.

Herbert Freundlich, 1914 Apr. 12. 1918 Apr. 14. 1934 Mar. 24; Apr. 29. 1938 Oct. 21. 1939 Jan. 14; Feb. 16; Apr. 8; July 3.

Alexander Frumkin, 1929 July 28. 1932 Apr. 14; Nov. 28. 1935 Dec. 14. 1941 Dec. 1. 1942 Oct. 18. 1945 June 22. 18 n.d.

Joseph S. Fruton, 1971 Oct. 7, 11.

Dennis Gabor, 1961 June 23.

Charles C. Gillespie, 1966 June 30; July 26; Nov. 4. 1968 Oct. 29.

David Goldstein, 1969 Feb. 25; Mar. 5, 27; Apr. 14, 18; May 2.

Sir Richard Gregory, 1942 Jan. 29, 30. 1943 Feb. 12; June 15.

Eduard Grüneisen, 1922 June 20.

Fritz Haber, 1923 Apr. 16. 1931 Aug. 5, 6; Dec. 31. 1932 June 27; Dec. 18. 1933 Jan. 23; Apr. 26. 2 n.d.

Otto Hahn, 1933 Sept. 21.

Robert S. Hansen, 1963 Jan. 30; Apr. 15; May 1.

Garrett Hardin, 1963 Feb. 21.

Sir Alister Hardy, 1969 Aug. 29; Oct. 16, 21. 1971 Dec. 9, 14. 1972 Apr. 20.

Romano Harré, 1967 Feb. 2; 1975 Feb. 15.

Sir Roy F. Harrod, 1945 Nov. 21, 28; Dec. 3, 19.

Robert D. Haworth, 1947 June 28, 30.

Sir Walter N. Haworth, 1946 Apr. 22.

Friedrich A. Hayek, 1939 Jan. 28. 1940 Jan. 31; Feb. 4; Apr. 18. 1941 May 1; July 1, 26. 1968 Feb. 2.

Werner Heisenberg, 1934 July 9.

Wilfred Heller, 1933 Sept. 12, 20, 22. 1934 Apr. 12. 1938 Oct. 25. 1939 Jan. 2. 2 n.d.

George C. de Hevesey, 1953 Apr. 29.

Joel Hildebrand, 1937 Feb. 26; Mar. 8.

Sir Cyril Hinshelwood, 1935 June 6, 8, 19, 27. 1937 Feb. 9, 12; Apr. 14, 15; June 4, 5. 1941 Jan. 27; Feb. 1. 1946 Feb. 11, 13. 3 n.d.

Lancelot Hogben, 1939 Nov. 23, 27, 30; Dec. 6, 8, 13.

Thorfin R. Hogness, 1942 Aug. 20; Oct. 27; Nov. 11.

Gerald Holton, 1963 Nov. 6, 12, 26. 1973 Sept. 20. 1974 Jan. 7.

Juro Horiuchi, 1934 Dec. 13. 1935 Feb. 4; Mar. 17, 20; Apr. 24; July 30; Aug. 29; Oct. 25. 1936 Jan. 13; July 3, 10. 1956 May 15. 2 n.d.

Robert M. Hutchins, 1964 Dec. 30.

Sir Christopher Ingold, 1934 Apr. 24, 30; Nov. 7, 8. 1935 Dec. 15. 1936 Mar. 28; Nov. 6. 1938 Jan. 11, 14, 17. 1939 May 16, 18; Sept. 28. 1940 June 13. 1941 Jan. 22; Feb. 5. 1942 June 10. 1946 Nov. 20, 21, 25, 29. 1947 July 9.

Oscar Jászi, 1935 Nov. 24. 1936 Aug. 22. 1937 Sept. 2. 1938 Jan. 3. 1939 Apr. 24. 1940 May 9; July 22; Sept. 20. 1941 Mar. 23; July 29. 1942 Dec. 20. 1944 Apr. 28; May 1, 27; July 5. 1945 Mar. 28; July 22; Oct. 12. 1946 Feb. 28. 1947 July 28; Aug. 22. 1948 Apr. 4; Dec. 15. 1949 Dec. 25. 1950 Nov. 27. 1952 Apr. 29. 1955 Oct. 14. 2 n.d.

Konstantin A. Jelenski, 1966 Feb. 11. 1969 June 27; July 15, 20, 31; Aug. 20, 26; Sept. 1, 3, 4, 8, 15, 17, 29; Oct. 7, 9, 13, 21. 1970 Aug. 10; Nov. 27. 1971 Oct. 14; Nov. 1; Dec. 30. 1972 Jan. 7; Feb. 7, 9, 11, 14, 21, 24; Mar. 1, 9, 13, 30; Apr. 3; May 30; June 5, 12, 25; July 31; Aug. 21. 1975 Jan. 16, 20; Mar. 17.

John Jewkes, 1936 Feb. 6, 11, 12; July 20; Dec. 7. 1937 Feb. 3. 1938 Dec. 13. 1939 Oct. 23. 1940 Feb. 7. 1941 June 27. 1943 Feb. 8. 1944 Jan. 10; Apr. 18. 1946 Nov. 18. 1947 May 7. 1948 May 5; "monday" [no month or day.] 1952 Dec. 1. 3 n.d.

Abram Joffé, 1935 July 5.

David Caradog Jones, 1942 Mar. 20, 31; Apr. 2. 1943 Jan. 30; Feb. 4, 12, 18; Mar. 20, 22.

Michael Josselson, 1969 Apr. 14, 21; May 1, 13; Aug. 25. 1970 Nov. 18; Dec. 4. 1971 Apr. 29; June 14; July 13; Nov. 4, 10. 1972 June 29; July 23; Sept. 14; Oct. 19.

Bertrand de Jouvenal, 1972 Jan. 12.

Ivan Kats, 1960 Nov. 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 18, 21, 22.

Edwin C. Kemble, 1947 Mar. 7; Apr. 16.

John Maynard Keynes, 1940 Feb. 6, 8, 19. 1945 Dec. 20; 1946 Feb. 23.

Frank Knight, 1948 Feb. 11; June 16.

Sigmund Koch, 1971 Jan. 7.

Arthur Koestler, 1941 May 15, 18, 23; June 1; July 12; Aug. 8, 13. 1942 Mar. 5; Apr. 26; July 8; Aug. 21. 1943 Jan. 25; Apr. 2; June 12; July 17; Aug. 5, 27; Sept. 1; Dec. 16. 1944 Jan. 10. 1946 Mar. 3, 15; Apr. 26, 30; May 21, 24; June 22; July 22; Aug. 29; Oct. 22; Nov. 14. 1947 Jan. 20, 22; Aug.14, 19. 1949 May 26. 1962 Mar. 8. 1967 Nov. 4. 1968 Oct. 14. 1969 Sept. 4, 17. 1970 Aug. 4. 1971 Dec. 16, 22. 1972 Jan. 13. 1973; Apr. 9. 4 n.d.

Elmer Kohler, 1935 Nov. 8, 21.

Nicholas Kurti, 1968 Sept. 7, 9. 1970 Nov. 11. 1972 May 14, 18. 1974 Jan. 7.

Imre Lakatos, 1969 Dec. 2, 5, 11. 1970 Jan. 28; Mar. 12. 1972 July 31; Aug. 24, 31.

Melvin Lasky, 1965 Mar. 3. 1967 Nov. 6. 1969 Sept. 16, 26; Oct. 9, 15, 20. 1970 June 2, 22, 24, 25; July 27. 1971 May 6.

Max von Laue, 1936 May 3, 13.

Wolfgang Leonhard, 1957 July 9, 15, 17.

Maurice Letort, 1945 Oct. 23.

P. A. Levene, 1935 Feb. 25.

W. Arthur Lewis, 1 n.d.

Samuel C. Lind, 1937 Feb. 8, 18.

Robert Livingston, 1934 Oct. 5.

Dame Kathleen Lonsdale, 1946 Nov. 27, 28.

Leo Lowenthal, 1963 Apr. 2.

Karl Mannheim, 1944 Jan. 10, 14; Feb. 1; Apr. 19, 26; May 2, 10, 27; June 13, 27, 29; July 27; Aug. 10, 16; Oct. 2, 23, 27. 1945 Jan. 1, 15; Mar. 6, 9; Apr. 12; May 23, 25, 26; Aug. 8, 17; Sept. 14, 18.

Hermann Mark, 1932 Dec. 23. 1933 Apr. 28; June 16; Aug. 16. 1934 Apr. 25. 1973 July 8.

Jacob Marshak, 1943 Aug. 31. 1948 Mar. 3, 23. 1973 Apr. 24; May 15; June 4; Dec. 18.

Abraham and Bertha Maslow, 1969 June 23. 1970 Oct. 5. 1971 Apr. 21; May 17. 1972 Mar. 9, 30; Apr. 11, 17, 24; July 5, 13, 19, 24; Aug. 2, 8; Oct. 2.

Wolfe Mays, 1969 June 28; July 9. 1970 Feb. 17, 19; Mar. 20; Apr. 3. 1973 Dec. 4, 31.

Eugen Merzbacher, 1964 May 2.

Otto Meyerhof, 1930 Mar. 23. 1932 Feb. 4. 1934 June 7. 1935 Mar. 13. 1936 Feb. 19. 1938 Aug. 30. 1939 Apr. 11. 1940 Feb. 13; Dec. 25. 1941 June 19; 1943 Dec. 10; 1944 January. 2 n.d.

Daniel P. Moynihan, 1968 May 7. 1969 June 2, 12. 1970 Jan. 19; Apr. 13, 20; July 2; Oct. 15; Nov. 3, 27; Dec. 1.

Michael Murphy, 1970 Mar. 3, 10.

Sir Lewis Namier, 1934 May 27; July 7.

Walter H. Nernst, 1913 Aug. 22, 30; Sept. 3; Oct. 15. 1914 Feb. 17. 1924 July 14.

Maxwell Newman, 1949 Sept. 19.

Ronald Norrish, 1938 Dec. 5.

Ivan Obreimov, 1 n.d.

Friedrich Paneth, 1920 Feb. 27; July 11; Oct. 27.

Maurice Pirenne, 1967 Sept. 6. 1968 July 17, 19. 1969 June 13; Aug. 23; Oct. 29; Nov. 7, 20, 21, 25, 28; Dec. 11. 1970 Jan. 16, 21; June 12, 25; July 17. 1971 Aug. 14, 31; Sept. 17. 1972 Oct. 25, 30. 1973 Mar. 15; May 30; Oct. 29; Nov. 1, 19. 1974 Sept. 10.

George Polya, 1945 Dec. 13. 1946 June 14; Oct. 21; Nov. 12. 1947 July 1. 1948 Sept. 27. 1969 Feb. 4, 11, 26; Apr. 6; Oct. 23.

Karl Popper, 1949 Oct. 11.

Oscar Rice, 1935; Nov. 6, 27.

Sir Eric Rideal, 1937 Dec. 1. 1939 May 9; Nov. 10, 14. 1940 May 31; June 1. 1942 Apr. 10. 1971; July 2, 13.

Sir Robert Robinson, 1933 Nov. 8. 1940 Jan. 11; Apr. 29. 1946 Feb. 12.

Carl Rogers, 1964 Jan. 1. 1968 Feb. 21; Aug. 29; Sept. 26; Dec. 31. 1969 Nov. 8, 15.

Peter Scheffler, 1963 Feb. 15

Edwin Schrödinger, 4 n.d.

Nicolai Semenoff, 1930 Feb. 15. 1931 Dec. 17. 1932 Mar. 1; Apr. 12. 1934 May 15; June 13; Aug. 11. 1935 Jan. 9; Mar. 21. 2 n.d.

Edward Shils, 1947 Sept. 8. 1955 Dec. 17 1957 June 4; Oct. 23. 1968 Dec. 6. 1969 Dec. 10. 1971 Oct. 19. 1972 Jan. 10, 13, 20, 31; Feb. 2, 8; July 18, 26; Aug. 20. 1973 Aug. 30; Sept. 17. 1 n.d.

Adolf Smekal, 1921 Nov. 21. 1922 Mar. 13; Apr. 7; May 8; June 29; Oct. 14.

C. P. Snow, 6 n.d.

Otto Stern, 1928 Oct. 10.

Shepard Stone, 1967 Dec. 11. 1968 Apr. 19; May 1, 31. 1969 May 6; June 10; July 9. 1970 Jan. 19, 22, 28.

Rex Stout, 1970 Apr. 27; June 17.

Leo Szilard, 1929 Apr. 1. 1933 Aug. 17; Dec. 11. 1934 Jan. 29; July 13. 1935 June 25. 1 n.d.

R. H. Tawney, 1943 July 1. 1944 Mar. 18.

A. J. P. Taylor, 1933 Sept. 21. 1 n.d.

Paul Tillich, 1963 May 21; June 4.

Alexander R. Todd, 1938 July 26.

Samuel Tolansky, 1942 Feb. 9, 12.

Theodore Von Karman, 1920 Mar. 17.

Sir Geoffrey Vickers, 1967 Dec. 12, 15. 1970 Jan. 30; July 5; Aug. 31; Oct. 2, 5, 7; Dec. 7, 10. 1971 Oct. 4 1972 Dec. 8. 1973 Mar. 27.

C. H. Waddington, 1960 Dec. 31. 1961 Jan. 3.

George Wald, 1964 May 30.

Sir Francis Walshe, 1956 June 17. 1957 May 11. 1963 Oct. 20, 26. 1964 Nov. 27. 1969 Aug. 1, 4. 1970 Sept. 16, 19; Oct. 5; Nov. 6, 13. 1971 Mar. 10.

Otto Warburg, 2 n.d.

Marx Wartofsky, 1969 July 29. 1971 June 21.

Dame Veronica Wedgwood, 1956 July 24. 1962 Sept. 23. 1963 Sept. 27. 1966 Oct. 2. 1970 May 14. 1972 July 19, 25; Aug. 8. 1973 Oct. 5. 7 n.d.

Sir Vincent Wigglesworth, 1972 Oct. 12, 19, 25.

Eugene Wigner, 1932 Oct. 18. 1933 Feb. 2; Apr. 13; June 25, 30; July 31; Oct. 7; Nov. 6. 1934 Jan. 12, 13; Apr. 7, 14; June 27; July 2; Aug. 3; Sept. 27. 1936 Dec. 8. 1937 June 23; Sept. 6; Oct. 5. 1938 Sept. 25. 1939 Sept. 19. 1940 Sept. 1. 1961 Apr. 3; June 20. 1962 Dec. 17. 1965 Dec. 30. 1966 Jan. 4, 5, 7, 8, 11, 18. 1968 Mar. 24. 1969 Sept. 4, 20. 1970 Jan. 26; Feb. 2; Mar. 23; Apr. 7; Nov. 2, 11; Dec. 15. 1971 Feb. 4; Mar. 16, 22; Apr. 24; May 3; Dec. 14, 16. 1972; Feb. 21; Mar. 4; Apr. 18; Dec. 2. 1973 June 14; July 28; Sept. 23; Oct. 25; Nov. 25. 1974 Feb. 2; Mar. 17; May 8. 10 n.d.

Dorothy Wrinch, 1935 Dec. 5.

Related Resources

The following related resources are located in the Department of Special Collections:

http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/spcl/select.html

Subject Headings

INVENTORY

Series I: Correspondence

This series includes all letters in the collection written to and by Michael Polanyi, Magda Polanyi, and Cecile Polanyi. The correspondence is arranged chronologically with undated letters organized alphabetically by correspondent at the end of the series. There are two folders of unidentified, undated correspondence and fragments following the identified undated correspondence (14:13-14). Letters from John R. Baker, Marjorie Grene, Joseph H. Oldham, Julius and Elsa Hollo, Harry Prosch, Karl and Ilona Polanyi, and Cecile Polanyi have been separately arranged (Boxes 14-20).

The correspondence in the Polanyi Papers amply documents the development of his scientific researches. His early scientific studies of adsorption and reaction kinetics are mentioned in several letters from the 1917-1919 period (1:5). In the autumn of 1920, he joined the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute; until 1933, when Polanyi left Berlin, he corresponded regularly with many of the leading scientists of Germany (1:6-2:15) and the larger European community (including James Franck, Otto Hahn, Werner Heisenberg, Wilfred Heller, and Leo Szilard.)

Subseries 1: General

Box 1   Folder 1

1900-1912

Box 1   Folder 2

1913-1914

Box 1   Folder 3

1915

Box 1   Folder 4

1916

Box 1   Folder 5

1917-1919

Box 1   Folder 6

1920, Jan-Feb

Box 1   Folder 7

1920, Mar-Apr

Box 1   Folder 8

1920, May

Box 1   Folder 9

1920, June

Box 1   Folder 10

1920, July-Sept

Box 1   Folder 11

1920, Oct-Nov

Box 1   Folder 12

1920, Dec

Box 1   Folder 13

1921, Jan-Mar

Box 1   Folder 14

1921, Apr-June

Box 1   Folder 15

1921, July-Sept

Box 1   Folder 16

1921, Oct-Dec

Box 1   Folder 17

1922, Jan-Apr

Box 1   Folder 18

1922, May-Oct

Box 1   Folder 19

1922, Nov-1923, May

Box 1   Folder 20

1923, June-Dec

Box 2   Folder 1

1924, Jan-July

Box 2   Folder 2

1924, Aug-1925, Dec

Box 2   Folder 3

1926-1927

Box 2   Folder 4

1928

Box 2   Folder 5

1929

Box 2   Folder 6

1930

Box 2   Folder 7

1931

Box 2   Folder 8

1932, Jan-May

Box 2   Folder 9

1932, June-Oct

Box 2   Folder 10

1932, Nov-Dec

Box 2   Folder 11

1933, Jan-Apr

Box 2   Folder 12

1933, May-Aug

Box 2   Folder 13

1933, Sept-Dec

Box 2   Folder 14

1934, Jan-Feb

Box 2   Folder 15

1934, Mar-Apr

Box 2   Folder 16

1934, May-June

Box 2   Folder 17

1934, July-Aug

Box 3   Folder 1

1934, Sept-Dec

Box 3   Folder 2

1935, Jan-Apr

Box 3   Folder 3

1935, May-July

Box 3   Folder 4

1935, Aug-Oct

Box 3   Folder 5

1935, Nov-Dec

Box 3   Folder 6

1936, Jan-June

Box 3   Folder 7

1936, July-Dec

Box 3   Folder 8

1937, Jan-Apr

Box 3   Folder 9

1937, May-Oct

Box 3   Folder 10

1937, Nov-Dec

Box 3   Folder 11

1938, Jan-May

Box 3   Folder 12

1938, June-Sept

Box 3   Folder 13

1938, Oct-Dec

Box 3   Folder 14

1939, Jan-Mar

Box 3   Folder 15

1939, Apr-June

Box 4   Folder 1

1939, July-Sept

Box 4   Folder 2

1939, Oct-Dec

Box 4   Folder 3

1940, Jan-Mar

Box 4   Folder 4

1940, Apr-July

Box 4   Folder 5

1940, Aug-Dec

Box 4   Folder 6

1941, Jan-June

Box 4   Folder 7

1941, July-Dec

Box 4   Folder 8

1942, Jan-Oct

Box 4   Folder 9

1942, Nov-1943, Mar

Box 4   Folder 10

1943, Apr-Dec

Box 4   Folder 11

1944, Jan-Oct

Box 4   Folder 12

1944, Nov-1945, May

Box 4   Folder 13

1945, June-Dec

Box 5   Folder 1

1946, Jan-May

Box 5   Folder 2

1946, June-Dec

Box 5   Folder 3

1947, Jan-June

Box 5   Folder 4

1947, July-Dec

Box 5   Folder 5

1948

Box 5   Folder 6

1949

Box 5   Folder 7

1950-1954

Box 5   Folder 8

1955

Box 5   Folder 9

1956

Box 5   Folder 10

1957

Box 5   Folder 11

1958

Box 5   Folder 12

1959

Box 5   Folder 13

1960, Jan-Oct

Box 5   Folder 14

1960, Nov-Dec

Box 6   Folder 1

1961

Box 6   Folder 2

1962

Box 6   Folder 3

1963, Jan-Sept

Box 6   Folder 4

1963, Oct-Dec

Box 6   Folder 5

1964, Jan-May

Box 6   Folder 6

1964, June-Dec

Box 6   Folder 7

1965

Box 6   Folder 8

1966

Box 6   Folder 9

1967, Jan-Apr

Box 6   Folder 10

1967, May-Dec

Box 6   Folder 11

1968, Jan

Box 6   Folder 12

1968, Feb-Mar

Box 6   Folder 13

1968, Apr

Box 6   Folder 14

1968, May

Box 7   Folder 1

1968, June

Box 7   Folder 2

1968, July

Box 7   Folder 3

1968, Aug

Box 7   Folder 4

1968, Sept

Box 7   Folder 5

1968, Oct

Box 7   Folder 6

1968, Nov

Box 7   Folder 7

1968, Dec

Box 7   Folder 8

1969, Jan-Feb

Box 7   Folder 9

1969, Mar-Apr

Box 7   Folder 10

1969, May

Box 7   Folder 11

1969, June 1-9

Box 7   Folder 12

1969, June 10-30

Box 7   Folder 13

1969, July

Box 7   Folder 14

1969, Aug 1-19

Box 7   Folder 15

1969, Aug 20-31

Box 7   Folder 16

1969, Sept

Box 7   Folder 17

1969, Oct 1-14

Box 8   Folder 1

1969, Oct 15-31

Box 8   Folder 2

1969, Nov

Box 8   Folder 3

1969, Dec

Box 8   Folder 4

1970, Jan

Box 8   Folder 5

1970, Feb 1-11

Box 8   Folder 6

1970, Feb 12-28

Box 8   Folder 7

1970, Mar

Box 8   Folder 8

1970, Apr

Box 8   Folder 9

1970, May

Box 8   Folder 10

1970, June, 1-17

Box 8   Folder 11

1970, June 18-30

Box 8   Folder 12

1970, July

Box 8   Folder 13

1970, Aug

Box 8   Folder 14

1970, Sept

Box 8   Folder 15

1970, Oct

Box 9   Folder 1

1970, Nov 1-16

Box 9   Folder 2

1970, Nov 17-24

Box 9   Folder 3

1970, Nov 25-31

Box 9   Folder 4

1970, Dec 1-11

Box 9   Folder 5

1970, Dec 12-31

Box 9   Folder 6

1971, Jan

Box 9   Folder 7

1971, Feb

Box 9   Folder 8

1971, Mar

Box 9   Folder 9

1971, Apr

Box 9   Folder 10

1971, May 1-10

Box 9   Folder 11

1971, May 11-31

Box 9   Folder 12

1971, June

Box 9   Folder 13

1971, July

Box 9   Folder 14

1971, Aug 1-19

Box 9   Folder 15

1971, Aug 20-31

Box 10   Folder 1

1971, Sept 1-13

Box 10   Folder 2

1971, Sept 14-30

Box 10   Folder 3

1971, Oct

Box 10   Folder 4

1971, Nov

Box 10   Folder 5

1971, Dec 1-9

Box 10   Folder 6

1971, Dec 10-31

Box 10   Folder 7

1972, Jan

Box 10   Folder 8

1972, Feb

Box 10   Folder 9

1972, Mar 1-8

Box 10   Folder 10

1972, Mar 9-31

Box 10   Folder 11

1972, Apr

Box 10   Folder 12

1972, May

Box 11   Folder 1

1972, June

Box 11   Folder 2

1972, July

Box 11   Folder 3

1972, Aug 1-10

Box 11   Folder 4

1972, Aug 11-31

Box 11   Folder 5

1972, Sept

Box 11   Folder 6

1972, Oct 1-10

Box 11   Folder 7

1972, Oct 11-31

Box 11   Folder 8

1972, Nov 1-15

Box 11   Folder 9

1972, Nov 16-30

Box 11   Folder 10

1972, Dec 1-14

Box 11   Folder 11

1972, Dec 15-31

Box 11   Folder 12

1973, Jan

Box 12   Folder 1

1973, Feb 1-16

Box 12   Folder 2

1973, Feb 17-23

Box 12   Folder 3

1973, Feb 24-28

Box 12   Folder 4

1973, Mar

Box 12   Folder 5

1973, Apr

Box 12   Folder 6

1973, May

Box 12   Folder 7

1973, June

Box 12   Folder 8

1973, July

Box 12   Folder 9

1973, Aug

Box 13   Folder 1

1973, Sept

Box 13   Folder 2

1973, Oct

Box 13   Folder 3

1973, Nov

Box 13   Folder 4

1973, Dec

Box 13   Folder 5

1974, Jan

Box 13   Folder 6

1974, Feb 1-18

Box 13   Folder 7

1974, Feb 19-28

Box 13   Folder 8

1974, Mar 1-24

Box 13   Folder 9

1974, Mar 25-31

Box 13   Folder 10

1974, Apr

Box 13   Folder 11

1974, May-June

Box 13   Folder 12

1974, July-Aug

Box 13   Folder 13

1974, Sept-Oct

Box 13   Folder 14

1974, Nov-Dec

Box 13   Folder 15

1975

Box 13   Folder 16

A-D, no date

Box 13   Folder 17

E-F, no date

Box 13   Folder 18

G-H, no date

Box 14    Folder 1

Julius and Elsa Hollo

Box 14    Folder 2

Julius and Elsa Hollo

Box 14    Folder 3

I-O

Box 14    Folder 4

Pa-Polanyi

Box 14    Folder 5

Pollacsek-Pz

Box 14    Folder 6

Q-S

Box 14    Folder 7

Laura Polanyi Striker

Box 14    Folder 8

Szecsi

Box 14    Folder 9

T-Z

Box 14    Folder 10

Unidentified

Box 14    Folder 11

Unidentified and fragments

Subseries 2: John R. Baker and the Society for Freedom in Science

Box 15   Folder 1

1941-1973

Box 15   Folder 2

Announcements, manuscripts, and offprints

Subseries 3: Joseph H. Oldham and the "Moot"

Box 15   Folder 3

1940-1947

Box 15   Folder 4

1948-1951

Box 15   Folder 5

1952-1964 and no date

Box 15   Folder 6

Manuscripts for presentation at meetings of the Moot, 1942-1944

Box 15   Folder 7

Manuscripts for presentation at meetings of the Moot, 1945-1946

Box 15   Folder 8

Manuscripts for presentation at meetings of the Moot, 1947-1948

Box 15   Folder 9

Manuscripts for presentation at meetings of the Moot, 1960

Box 15   Folder 10

Manuscripts for presentation at meetings of the Moot, no date

Subseries 4: Marjorie Grene and the Unity of Knowledge Group

Box 16   Folder 1

1953-1967

Box 16   Folder 2

1968, Jan-Apr

Box 16   Folder 3

1968, May-Dec

Box 16   Folder 4

1969

Box 16   Folder 5

1970

Box 16   Folder 6

1971-1972

Box 16   Folder 7

1973-1974

Box 16   Folder 8

No date

Box 16   Folder 9

Manuscripts

Subseries 5: Harry Prosch

Box 16   Folder 10

1967-1969

Box 16   Folder 11

1970-1971

Box 16   Folder 12

1972

Box 16   Folder 13

1973

Box 16   Folder 14

1974-1975 and no date

Box 16   Folder 15

Manuscripts and offprints

Subseries 6: Karl and Ilona Polanyi

Box 17   Folder 1

1913-1917

Box 17   Folder 2

1918-1923

Box 17   Folder 3

1924-1929

Box 17   Folder 4

1930-1933

Box 17   Folder 5

1934-1935

Box 17   Folder 6

1936-1937

Box 17   Folder 7

1938

Box 17   Folder 8

1939

Box 17   Folder 9

1940-1941

Box 17   Folder 10

1942-1943

Box 17   Folder 11

1944-1949

Box 17   Folder 12

1950-1970

Box 17   Folder 13

No date

Box 17   Folder 14

No date

Box 17   Folder 15

No date

Box 17   Folder 16

Karl Polanyi, clippings and obituaries

Subseries 7: Cecile Polanyi

Box 18    Folder 1

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 18    Folder 2

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 18    Folder 3

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 18    Folder 4

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 18    Folder 5

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 18    Folder 6

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 18    Folder 7

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 18    Folder 8

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 18    Folder 9

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 18    Folder 10

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 18    Folder 11

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 19   Folder 1

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 19   Folder 2

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 19   Folder 3

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 19   Folder 4

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 19   Folder 5

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 19   Folder 6

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 19   Folder 7

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 19   Folder 8

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 19   Folder 9

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 19   Folder 10

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 20   Folder 1

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 20   Folder 2

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 20   Folder 3

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 20   Folder 4

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 20   Folder 5

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Box 20   Folder 6

Correspondence, Manuscripts, and Memorabilia of Cecile Polanyi (unsorted)

Series II: Notes

The Notes are divided into subject and author sections. The subject notes have been drawn together from materials originally labeled "miscellaneous" by Professor Polanyi's secretary. They have been organized topically and placed in alphabetical order. The author notes are compilations of quotes by and commentaries on authors whose work interested Polanyi. All of the author notes are grouped together and are arranged alphabetically by last name.

Subseries 1: Subject

Box 21   Folder 1

Art

Box 21   Folder 2

Communism

Box 21   Folder 3

Congress for Cultural Freedom

Box 21   Folder 4

Culture

Box 21   Folder 5

Cybernetics

Box 21   Folder 6

Economics

Box 21   Folder 7

Formalization

Box 21   Folder 8

Heuristics

Box 21   Folder 9

Imagination

Box 21   Folder 10

Integration

Box 21   Folder 11

Knowledge

Box 21   Folder 12

Liberty

Box 21   Folder 13

Literature

Box 21   Folder 14

Logic

Box 21   Folder 15

Meaning

Box 21   Folder 16

The Mind

Box 21   Folder 17

The Mind

Box 22   Folder 1

Myth

Box 22   Folder 2

Neurology and psychiatry

Box 22   Folder 3

Perception

Box 22   Folder 4

Psychology

Box 22   Folder 5

Reality

Box 22   Folder 6

Religion and theology

Box 22   Folder 7

Science-misc.

Box 22   Folder 8

Scientific discovery

Box 22   Folder 9

Scientific knowledge

Box 22   Folder 10

Scientific organization

Box 22   Folder 11

Scientific planning and development

Box 22   Folder 12

Scientific responsibility

Box 22   Folder 13

Thought

Box 22   Folder 14

Syllabus on unspecifiable elements of knowledge

Box 22   Folder 15

Syllabus on unspecifiable elements of knowledge

Box 22   Folder 16

Washington notes, 1967

Box 22   Folder 17

Miscellaneous notes and fragments

Box 22   Folder 18

Miscellaneous notes and fragments

Box 22   Folder 19

Miscellaneous notes and fragments

Subseries 2: Author

Box 23   Folder 1

A

  • Lord Acton
  • D. K. Adams
  • John Couch Adams
  • C. K. Allen
  • E. N. Da Costa Andrade
  • Agnes Arber
  • Aristotle
  • Kenneth Arrow
  • Association of Scientific Workers
  • R. J. C. Atkinson
  • St. Augustine
  • A. J. Ayer
Box 23   Folder 2

B

  • Walter Bagehot
  • John D. Baker
  • Robert H. Baker
  • Michael Balint
  • Lawrence Balls
  • Owen Barfield
  • J. Baron
  • William Barrett
  • Carl Barth
  • Charles Baudelaire
  • A. G. Baumgarten
  • Bertrand Beaumont
  • Carl Becker
  • Ruth Benedict
  • Jeremy Bentham
  • Charles Berg
  • George Berkeley
  • Isaiah Berlin
Box 23   Folder 3

B

  • A. Bethe
  • Ernst Bevin
  • Ludwig Bieberbach
  • Max Black
  • H. J. Blackham
  • Brand Blanshard
  • E. G. Boring
  • Franz Borkenau
  • Max Born
  • Bernard Bosanquet
  • J. Bradford
  • James Braid
  • Lord Brain
  • John Brennan
  • Franz Brentano
  • Percy W. Bridgman
  • Crane Brinton
Box 23   Folder 4

B

  • Karl Britton
  • D. W. Brogan
  • Charles V. W. Brooks
  • Lloyd A. Brown
  • Lenny Bruce
  • Rudolf Bultmann
  • Jacob Burckhardt
  • Edmund Burke
  • D. Burlingham
  • J. B. Bury
  • M. Butenko
  • Samuel Butler
  • Herbert Butterfield
  • F. J. J. Buytendijk
  • Major Byron
Box 23   Folder 5

C

  • Norman Campbell
  • S. Cannizzaro
  • W. B. Cannon
  • Hadley Cantril
  • Justice Cardoza
  • Rudolf Carnap
  • Edward H. Carr
  • E. Cassirer
  • N. Chiaromonte
  • G. Childe
Box 23   Folder 6

C

  • R. M. Chisholm
  • Noam Chomsky
  • E. M. Chossudowsky
Box 23   Folder 7

C

  • Galeazzo Ciano
  • E. Claparede
  • W. K. Clifford
  • Morris R. Cohen
  • G. D. H. Cole
  • Samuel Coleridge
  • R. G. Collingwood
  • Alistair Cooke
  • Copernicus
  • F. C. Copleston
  • Gabor Cossa
  • Maurice Cranston
  • O. G. S. Crawford
  • Ernest Crocker
  • A. C. Crombie
  • J. G. Crowther
Box 23   Folder 8

D

  • Albert Dalcq
  • Honoré Daumier
  • Simone de Beauvoir
  • J. De Boer
  • Democritus
  • René Descartes
  • Friedrich Dessauer
  • John Dewey
  • Charles Dickens
  • Henry D. Dickinson
Box 23   Folder 9

D

  • Diogenes
  • P. A. M. Dirac
  • Maurice Dobb
  • S. Dobrin
  • Peter Doig
  • Rene Dubos
  • Pierre Duhem
  • E. F. M. Durbin
Box 23   Folder 10

E

  • Ralph Eaton
  • Ilya Ehrenburg
  • Jan Ehrenwald
  • Albert Einstein
  • Mircea Eliade
  • T. S. Eliot
  • J. Elliotson
  • W. N. Elsasser
  • C. W. Eriksen
  • Erwin A. Esper
  • Leonard Euler
  • E. E. Evans-Pritchard
Box 23   Folder 11

F

  • Françoise Faber
  • M. S. Farbman
  • Herbert Feigl
  • Raymond Firth
  • Irving Fisher
  • R. A. Fisher
  • Constantine Fitzgibbon
  • P. Sargant Florence
  • M. Fortes
  • H. Munro Fox
  • Max Frisch
  • Kurt von Fritz
  • J. F. Fulton
Box 23   Folder 12

G

  • Alan H. Gardiner
  • Ortega y Gasset
  • F. H. George
  • A. Gesell
  • C. V. Gheorghiu
  • K. Gibberd
  • Edward Gibbon
  • J. J. Gibson
  • André Gide
  • C. C. Gillispie
  • E. Gilman
  • Nicholas Gimes
  • Etienne Gilson
  • A. D. Glanville
  • E. Glover
  • M. Gluckman
  • John Godley
Box 23   Folder 13

G

  • Goethe
  • I. J. Good
  • Geoffrey Gorer
  • A. W. Gouldner
  • Alexander Gray
  • J. S. Gray
  • Marjorie Grene
  • Adolf Grünbaum
  • Luther Gulick
  • Gumbel
Box 23   Folder 14

H

  • J. A. Bierens de Haan
  • Kurt Hahn
  • C. Haldane
  • J. S. Haldane
  • Elie Halevy
  • Philip P. Hallie
  • Barbara Hammond
  • John L. Hammond
  • N. R. Hanson
  • D. W. Harding
  • Alister Hardy
  • G. H. Hardy
  • R. M. Hare
  • S. C. Harland
  • Romano Harré
  • G. Hart
  • H. L. A. Hart
  • Liddell Hart
  • A. H. Hastorf
  • F. A. Hayek
  • D. O. Hebb
Box 23   Folder 15

H

  • L. Heck
  • G. W. Hegel
  • H. L. F. Helmholtz
  • C. G. Hempel
  • David Henderson
  • J. G. von Herder
  • Gordon Hewart
  • E. P. Hilgard
  • Thomas Hobbes
  • A. M. Hocart
  • P.H. d'Holbach
  • J. Holloway
  • S. J. Holmes
  • Erik von Holst
  • Homer
Box 23   Folder 16

H

  • Sir J. D. Hooker
  • Karen Horney
  • A. E. Housman
  • L. E. Hubbard
  • R. Hughes
  • Clark L. Hull
  • George Humphrey
  • Evan Hunter
  • Edmund Husserl
  • Julian Huxley
Box 24   Folder 1

I-J

  • Orvis C. Irwin
  • William James
  • Storm Jameson
  • Sir James Jeans
  • G. Jefferson
  • N. Jeffreys
  • Otto Jespersen
  • C. E. M. Joad
  • Harry M. Johnson
  • Hewlett Johnson
  • H. Spencer Jones
  • J. W. Jones
  • Mansel Jones
  • C. G. Jung
Box 24   Folder 2

K

  • Joseph Kälin
  • Immanuel Kant
  • David Katz
  • Walter Kaufmann
Box 24   Folder 3

K

  • Jacques Kayser
  • Paul Kecskemeti
  • W. N. Kellogg
  • Peter Kende
  • Kenneth Keniston
  • C. S. Kenny
  • Johannes Kepler
  • J. M. Keynes
  • Gregory A. Kimble
  • A. W. Kinglake
  • Rudyard Kipling
  • E. L. Kirchner
  • George Klein
  • C. Kluckhohn
Box 24   Folder 4

K

  • Arthur Koestler
  • K. Koffka
  • Eugen Kogon
  • Ivo Kohler
  • Wolfgang Köhler
  • K. Kottenhoff
  • Alexandre Koyre
  • I. Krechevsky
  • Thomas Kuhn
Box 24   Folder 5

L

  • G. A. de Laguna
  • R. D. Laing
  • Charles Lamb
  • Johannes Lange
  • Susanne K. Langer
  • Pierre Laplace
  • K. S. Lashley
  • Lancelot Lawton
  • W. E. H. Lecky
  • G. W. Leibnitz
Box 24   Folder 6

L

  • N. Lenin
  • W. F. Leopold
  • Hermann Levy
  • Lucien Levy-Bruhl
  • Kurt Lewin
  • Clarence I. Lewis
  • W. A. Lewis
  • H. S. Liddell
Box 24   Folder 7

L

  • Lord Lindsay
  • Leonard Linsky
  • Ralph Linton
  • Walter Lippmann
  • John Locke
  • Otto Loewi
  • Konrad Lorenz
  • H. A. Lorentz
  • F. Lorimer
  • R. H. Lowie
  • T. D. Lysenko
Box 24   Folder 8

M

  • William McDougall
  • D. V. McGranahan
  • N. Machiavelli
  • Admiral Mahan
  • N. R. F. Maier
  • Sir Henry Sumner Miane
  • Bronislaw Malinowski
  • John M. Manly
  • Jacob Marshak
  • J. H. Massermann
  • Henri Matisse
  • W. Somerset Maugham
  • James Clerk Maxwell
  • Margaret Mead
  • P. B. Medawar
  • Friedrich Meinecke
  • Philip Melanchthon
  • J. A. Melrose
  • Robert K. Merton
  • Albert Michelson
Box 24   Folder 9

M

  • André Michotte
  • N. Micklem
  • Idézet G. Miklos
  • J. S. Mill
  • George A. Miller
  • Richard von Mises
  • Ian I. Mitroff
  • Joseph-Marie Montmasson
  • C. W. Morris
  • W. A. Mozart
  • Carl Murchison
  • Gilbert Murray
Box 24   Folder 10

N-O

  • S. F. Nadel
  • Joseph Needham
  • Ernest Newman
  • John Henry Cardinal Newman
  • Max Newman
  • Harold Nicolson
  • Reinhold Niebuhr
  • Paul Niggli
  • F. S. C. Northrop
  • Michael Oakeshott
  • John Oman
  • J. Robert Oppenheimer
  • W. Ostwald
Box 24   Folder 11

P

  • C. F. A. Pantin
  • Paracelsus
  • Sir J. H. Parsons
  • Talcott Parsons
  • J. R. Partington
  • R. Pearl
  • D. F. Pears
  • Karl Pearson
  • Wilder Penfield
  • C. V. Peursen
  • O. Pfungst
  • F. A. Philbrick
  • Charles Louis Philippe
  • Jean Piaget
Box 24   Folder 12

P

  • Pablo Picasso
  • Maurice Pirenne
  • Max Planck
  • Arnold Plant
  • Plato
  • Henri Poincaré
  • Sir Fredrick Pollock
  • Georg Polya
  • Karl Popper
  • F. M. Powicke
  • Derek J. de Solla Price
  • H. H. Price
  • Terence Prittie
Box 24   Folder 13

Q-R

  • W. V. Quine
  • Gerhard Rasmussen
  • Hermann Rauschning
  • Charles E. Raven
  • Herbert Read
  • G. Revesz
  • Quentin Reynolds
  • Rheticus
  • Willis B. Rice
  • I. A. Richards
Box 24   Folder 14

R

  • M. Richardson
  • Rainer Maria Rilke
  • Gerhard P. Ritter
  • D. H. Robertson
  • E. A. G. Robinson
  • Joan Robinsonq
  • J. J. Rousseau
  • Bertrand Russell
  • E. S. Russell
  • H. N. Russell
Box 25   Folder 1

S

  • Antoine de Saint-Exupery
  • Andrew Salter
  • S. Sambursky
  • Edward Sapir
  • Jean-Paul Sartre
  • Joseph Sauveur
  • Martin Scheerer
  • Max Scheler
  • Frank Schlesinger
  • J. A. Schumpeter
  • Leopold Schwarzschild
  • John Scott
  • Michael Scriven
Box 25   Folder 2

S

  • Ignaz Seipel
  • R. S. Shankland
  • Hugh Shearnon
  • A. D. Sheffield
  • P. B. Shelley
  • Sir Charles Sherrington
  • Edward Shils
  • Charles Singer
  • B. F. Skinner
  • J. J. C. Smart
  • Howard K. Smith
  • J. N. Smith
  • Lillian Smith
Box 25   Folder 3

S

  • Maynard Smith
  • T. B. Smith
  • A. Smits
  • J. C. Smuts
  • Bruno Snell
  • F. Soddy
  • R. V. Southwell
  • C. Spearman
  • Herbert Spencer
  • Roger W. Sperry
  • Joseph Stalin
  • Sir Josiah C. Stamp
  • Franz Stampfl
  • L. Susan Stebbing
  • K. Steer
  • Sir James Fitzjames Stephen
  • Karin Stephen
  • Charles L. Stevenson
  • G. F. Stout
  • John Strachey
  • E. B. Strauss
  • Leo Strauss
  • Igor Stravinsky
  • P. F. Strawson
  • Count Stürgkh
  • Z. Stypulkowski
  • H. Sutherland
Box 25   Folder 4

T

  • Alfred Tarski
  • F. Sherwood Taylor
  • Dylan Thomas
  • Denys Thompson
  • L. L. Thurstone
  • Paul Tillich
  • Rudolf Tischner
  • E. C. Tolman
  • Stephen Toulmin
  • George M. Trevelyan
  • Lionel Trilling
  • W. Trotter
Box 25   Folder 5

U-V

  • Stephen Ullman
  • J. O. Urmson
  • Peter Usley
  • Paul Valerie
  • Immanuel Velikovsky
  • G. N. A. Vesey
  • Sir Geoffrey Vickers
  • Mark Vischniak
  • Karl Vossler
Box 25   Folder 6

W

  • C. H. Waddington
  • Friedrich Waismann
  • A. Wald
  • Graham Wallas
  • W. H. Walsh
  • A. F. Watts
  • Richard M. Weaver
  • Max Weber
  • Simone Weil
  • J. R. Weinberg
  • Paul Weiss
  • Viktor von Weizsäcker
  • Max Wertheimer
  • George P. West
  • Hermann Weyl
  • W. M. Wheeler
  • William Whewell
Box 25   Folder 7

W-Z

  • A. N. Whitehead
  • Norbert Wiener
  • Eugene P. Wigner
  • Basil Willey
  • Charles Williams
  • R. A. Wilson
  • R. S. Woodworth
  • Virginia Woolf
  • William Wordsworth
  • Orville and Wilbur Wright
  • H. G. Wyatt
  • William Butler Yeats
  • Catherine York
  • Lin Yutang
  • Ernst Zinner
  • Carl Zuckmayer

Subseries 3: File Cards

Box 25   Folder 7a

A-W

  • Artists on Art
  • Gaston Bachelard
  • A. J. Bachrach
  • William Barret
  • Reinhard Bendix
  • Rene Berthelot
  • Maine de Biran
  • Erwin Boring
  • K. E. Boulding
  • J. Bronovski
  • Jerome S. Bruner
  • Kenneth Burke
  • Edwin Burit
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Coleridge
  • A. C. Crombie
  • J. G. Crowther
  • Friedrich Dessauer
  • John Dewey
  • Albert Einstein
  • Jacques Ellul
  • Austin Farter
  • Leon Festinger
  • A. Gruenbaum
  • Georges Gusdorf
  • William S. Haas
  • N. R. Hanson
  • Ralph Hefferline
  • E. E. Hirschmann
  • William James
  • Kepler
  • John F. Kennedy
  • Ivo Kohler
  • Lerzch Kolakowski
  • Alfred Korzybski
  • K. S. Lashley
  • Thomas Mann
  • Simon Marcus
  • Adolf Sperl
  • A. Michotte
  • George A. Miller
  • A. J. M. Milne
  • Oskar Morgenstern
  • Desmond Morris
  • S. F. Nadel
  • Everett C. Olson
  • R. R. Palmer
  • A. Pannekoek
  • William Penn
  • Perception
  • Rheticus
  • Harrison E. Salisbury
  • Th. R. Sarbin
  • Max Scheler
  • Hugh Seton-Watson
  • Murray Sidman
  • Bruno Snell
  • P. F. Strawson
  • W. Edgar Vinacke
  • Waddington
  • Wasil Willey
  • Viktor von Weizsäcker
  • Sheldon S. Wolin

Series III: Manuscripts

Series III, Manuscripts contains drafts and final copies of lectures and publications, German scientific manuscripts, speeches of introduction and thanks, patents, records of laboratory financial expenditures, poetry, notebooks, and bibliographic citations.

The drafts and final copies of lectures and publications (25:8-43:2) have been arranged chronologically by order of composition, with undated manuscripts listed alphabetically at the end of the section. Within yearly groups, the manuscripts are arranged alphabetically by the titles given them at the time of composition. All titles are in italics except for chapter headings and untitled manuscripts, identified by first line of text, which are placed in quotation marks. Brief manuscripts of less than five pages are ordered in folders labeled "miscellaneous short manuscripts." The manuscripts have not been matched with any bibliography of Polanyi's published or unpublished writings except as an aid in determining the date of composition. Revised versions of manuscripts are placed under the date of revision and not under the date of original composition. An exception to this rule occurs when a group of manuscripts have been brought together for a specific lecture, such as occurs in 33:1-4. In such an instance, the manuscripts are organized under the date of the lecture with the date of original composition listed parenthetically.

The remaining manuscripts (44:3-44:11) follow the drafts and final copies of lectures and publications. The German scientific manuscripts (43:3-4) are fragmentary and contain little substantive information on the scientific work of Professor Polanyi. The speeches of introduction and thanks (43:5) consist of brief remarks made by Polanyi at banquets and conferences. The patents and records of laboratory expenditures (43:6-7) contain fragmentary evidence for Polanyi's work at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute between 1923 and 1933. The small section of poetry (43:8) holds verses by Michael Polanyi as well as poems written for him on special occasions. The nine notebooks in the collection are difficult to categorize because of diverse contents. There are four short and jumbled diaries covering the period 1926-1947 (44:1-4). In addition there are four undated notebooks (44:5) which contain brief thoughts and comments on miscellaneous authors, the English countryside, the weather, and other equally diverse subject matter. The final notebook (44:6) is an obsolete index to Professor Polanyi's correspondence files. The manuscripts series concludes with five folders of bibliographic citations.

The earliest dated manuscripts are from 1936 and deal exclusively with economics and philosophy. There is one small group of scientific manuscripts (43:3-4,7) but they are fragmentary and indicate little about Polanyi's scientific work. The sections on science in the research notes (22:7-12) are philosophical in nature. Manuscripts such as the 1935 lectures on economics (25:9), the 1943 essays on economic planning (28:1-3), and the 1944 Principles of Economic Expansion (29:11-12) are interesting interpretations of Keynesian thought. Other manuscripts from this period like the 1938 Reflections on Marxism (25:16), the 1940 Collectivist Planning (26:3), and the 1947 Soviets and Capitalism (31:4) are criticisms of Soviet economics. By contrast, the notes contain little of relevance to Polanyi's economic thought. There are a few general notes on economic subjects (21:6) as well as material on individual economists like Keynes and von Hayek, but the majority of economic material is found in the correspondence and manuscripts.

Subseries 1: 1936

Box 25   Folder 8

An Attitude Toward Jews and Non-Jews

Box 25   Folder 9

Lectures on Economics

  • Popular Education in Economics
  • Suggestions for a New Research Section
  • Visual Presentation of Social Matters
Box 25   Folder 10

Notes on a Film

Box 25   Folder 11

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Notes on the Position of Science
  • On Reason
  • On Truth
  • Panic in Wall Street
  • Science and Liberty
  • Truth and Justice, Ideas and Belief
Box 25   Folder 12

Russian and Soviet Economics lecture

Box 25   Folder 13

Trade Cycle

Box 25   Folder 14

The Working of Money: Booms and Slumps

Box 25   Folder 15

Untitled manuscripts

  • "In England 'contempt of court' is propaganda..."
  • "One of the great English parliamentary orators..."
  • "In 'Nature' October 30th..."
  • "Adventure of research..."
  • Subseries 2: 1938
Box 25   Folder 16

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Contemporary Problems
  • Genetics in the U.S.S.R.
  • Reflections on Marxism

Subseries 3: 1939

Box 26   Folder 1

Miscellaneous short manuscripts and untitled manuscripts

  • Notes on Prejudice
  • Review of Colin Clark, A Critique of Russian Statistics
  • "Difficulties experienced in the past..."
  • "It has been forcibly stated..."
  • "Physicists say that the supreme proof..."
  • "Science is a body of valid ideas..."
Box 26   Folder 2

Book plan titled The Struggle of Man in Society

Subseries 4: 1940

Box 26   Folder 3

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Collectivist Planning
  • Introductory Survey of Economic Ideas
  • The Liberal Ideal
Box 26   Folder 4

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • The Organization of Scientific Life
  • Planning and Soviet Science
  • Planning, Culture and Freedom
  • Planning, Efficiency and Liberty
  • Science in the U.S.S.R.
  • Review of Eugene Varga, Two Systems
Box 26   Folder 5

Untitled manuscripts

  • "Dictatorships in Germany, Italy, and Russia..."
  • "I think it imperative..."
  • "Outline common principles..."
  • "The Socialist revolution..."
  • "While the benefits..."

Subseries 5: 1941

Box 26   Folder 6

Foundations of Freedom in Science

Box 26   Folder 7

The Independence of Science

Box 26   Folder 8

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Commercialized Property
  • A General Scheme of Social Mechanism
  • Ideas and Cities
  • The Liberal Conception of Freedom
  • Modern Millennism
Box 26   Folder 9

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • The New Economics
  • Politics; Russia and Germany, April 1941
  • The Process of Legislation
  • Science and Modern Civilization
  • Science and Society
  • Scientific Life
  • Six Conditions for the Operation of Resources Forming Personal Property
Box 26   Folder 10

The Rights and Duties of Science

Box 26   Folder 11

The Social Message of Science

Box 26   Folder 12

Social planning lectures

Box 26   Folder 13

Social planning lectures

Box 26   Folder 14

Socialism and Liberalism Today

Box 27   Folder 1

Withrington League of Nations Union Lecture

Box 27   Folder 2

Two untitled notebooks

Subseries 6: 1942

Box 27   Folder 3

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • The City of Science
  • Free Trade Through Full Employment
  • General Will Under the Law
  • Jewish Problems
  • The Liberal Conception of Freedom (revised)
Box 27   Folder 4

Science, Welfare and the State

Box 27   Folder 5

Socialism Examined in Theory

Box 27   Folder 6

The Structure of Freedom

Box 27   Folder 7

The Structure of Freedom

Box 27   Folder 8

The Structure of Freedom: Welfare

Box 27   Folder 9

The Structure of Freedom: Welfare

Box 27   Folder 10

The Structure of Freedom: Welfare

Box 27   Folder 11

The Structure of Freedom: Welfare

Box 27   Folder 12

The Structure of Freedom: Welfare

Subseries 7: 1943

Box 28   Folder 1

Economic Planning

Box 28   Folder 2

Economic Planning

Box 28   Folder 3

Liberalism and Monopoly, Draft Memo on a Planned Economy

Box 28   Folder 4

Limits of State Power

Box 28   Folder 5

Limits of State Power

Box 28   Folder 6

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • The Autonomy of Science
  • Cambridge discussion notes
  • Economics of Full Employment
  • Organization of Science
  • Review of Harold J. Laski, Reflections on the Revolution of our Time
  • Science and the Modern Crisis
  • Uncertainty
Box 28   Folder 7

Property and Subordination in Science (manuscript and notes)

Box 28   Folder 8

The Reaction from Free Trade

Box 28   Folder 9

Science, Ideals and Society

Box 28   Folder 10

Science, Ideals and Society

Box 28   Folder 11

Science, Ideals and Society

Box 28   Folder 12

Science, Ideals and Society

Box 28   Folder 13

Science-Its Reality and Freedom

Box 29   Folder 1

Science, miscellaneous manuscripts and notes

Box 29   Folder 2

Socialism Examined in Theory (revised)

Box 29   Folder 3

Socialism Examined in Theory (revised)

Box 29   Folder 4

Socialism Examined in Theory (revised)

Box 29   Folder 5

Three untitled notebooks

Subseries 8: 1944

Box 29   Folder 6

Economic Planning

Box 29   Folder 7

Economic Planning

Box 29   Folder 8

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • The European Crisis
  • Planning and Civic Liberty
  • Reflections on John Dalton
  • Three Periods of History
  • Review of Erwin Schrödinger, What is Life?
Box 29   Folder 9

Patent Reform

Box 29   Folder 10

Patent Reform

Box 29   Folder 11

Principles of Economic Expansion, Chapter 2, "Free Trade Doctrine on Unemployment"

Box 29   Folder 12

Principles of Economic Expansion, Chapters 3-4, "The Reaction from Free Trade," and "The Retreat from Socialism"

Box 29   Folder 13

Science and the Decline of Freedom

Box 29   Folder 14

Science and the Modern Crisis

Subseries 9: 1945

Box 30   Folder 1

Essays on liberalism

  • Programme of a Liberal Philosophy
  • The Structure of Liberalism
  • Liberalism-Rise and Decline
  • The Liberal & the Totalitarian Way
Box 30   Folder 2

Miscellaneous short manuscripts and untitled manuscripts

  • Applied Science
  • Foundations of Academic Freedom
  • Review of Ortega y Gasset, Mission of the University
  • Notes from Broadcast to Germany
  • Notes from Holly Royde
  • Review of John R. Baker, Science and the Planned State
  • The Social Message of Pure Science
  • The Unity of Science
  • "In 'Science' Magazine..."
  • "The past ten years..."
  • "The future historian..."
  • "Among people concerned with scholarship..."
Box 30   Folder 3

The Planning of Science

Box 30   Folder 4

Science and Welfare

Subseries 10: 1946

Box 30   Folder 5

From Adam Smith to Keynes

Box 30   Folder 6

The Foundations of Freedom in Science

Box 30   Folder 7

The Foundations of Freedom in Science

Box 30   Folder 8

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Can Science Bring Peace?
  • The Challenge of our Time
  • The Fall of Europe
  • Foreign Policy and Atomic Power
  • Freedom in Science
  • Full Employment in a Free Economy
Box 30   Folder 9

Miscellaneous short manuscripts and untitled manuscripts

  • Notes on the Possibility of a Popular Renaissance of Spiritual Beliefs
  • The Politics of the Atomic Age
  • Popular Economic Problems
  • Rededication in Germany
  • Revolution in Economic Thought
  • Science and the World Crisis
  • Social Capitalism
  • Review of Alexander Baykov, Soviet Economic System
  • The Struggle for Moral Survival
  • "I often wonder..."
Box 30   Folder 10

Principles of Economic Organization

Box 30   Folder 11

Science, Observation and Belief

Box 30   Folder 12

The Struggle for Faith

Subseries 11: 1947

Box 30   Folder 13

The Financing of Universities

Box 30   Folder 14

The Foundations of Academic Freedom (revised)

Box 31   Folder 1

Jewish Problems

Box 31   Folder 2

Memorandum on the Atomic Bomb

Box 31   Folder 3

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Answers to Questions at the Meeting of the Economic Reform Club
  • British Crisis (1947-?)
  • The Growth of Thought in Society
  • Humanitas
  • Inflationary Tendencies of Modern Socialism
  • Notes on Historic Determinism
  • Old Tasks and New Hopes
Box 31   Folder 4

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Over-Optimism about Russia?
  • Science, Academic and Industrial
  • Review of E. Ashby, Scientist in Russia
  • Soviets and Capitalism
  • Speech of Thanks for Honorary Degree, the University of Leeds, 14 May 1947
  • Two Kinds of Order
  • The Universities Today
Box 31   Folder 5

Modern Science and Modern Thought

Box 31   Folder 6

Organization of Universities

Box 31   Folder 7

Political Control of Scientists

Box 31   Folder 8

The Relevance of Universities

Box 31   Folder 9

The Universities Today

Box 31   Folder 10

What to Believe

Subseries 12: 1948

Box 31   Folder 11

Dynamic Order

Box 31   Folder 12

Dynamic Order

Box 31   Folder 13

Dynamic Order

Box 31   Folder 14

Economic lectures (untitled)

Box 32   Folder 1

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Ancestry of the Idea of Central Economic Planning
  • Aus der Welt der Wissenschaft
  • Education-By Whose Authority?
  • The Free Society
  • Review of Bertrand Russell, Human Knowledge
  • Review of E. M. Friedwald, Man's Last Choice
  • Michurinist Education and Achievements
Box 32   Folder 2

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Notes Taken in France
  • Organization of Science
  • Planning and Spontaneous Order
  • Science's Part in the Spiritual Struggle
  • Review of Hans Morgenthau, Scientific Man versus Power Politics
  • Thinking about Thought
Box 32   Folder 3

The Planning of Science

  • Ought Science to be Planned?
Box 32   Folder 4

Thought and Order

Box 32   Folder 5

Thought and Order

Subseries 13: 1949

Box 32   Folder 6

Can the Mind Be Represented by a Machine?

Box 32   Folder 7

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Review of John M. Clark, Alternative to Serfdom
  • Review of Arthur Koestler, Insight and Outlook
  • Review of Paul Freedman, The Principles of Scientific Research

Subseries 14: 1950

Box 32   Folder 8

The Logic of Liberty, Lectures at the University of Chicago, Lecture 1, "Perils of Inconsistency"

Box 32   Folder 9

The Logic of Liberty, Lecture 3, "Freedom in Science"

Box 32   Folder 10

The Logic of Liberty, Lecture 4, "The Span of Central Control"

Box 32   Folder 11

The Logic of Liberty, Lecture 5, "Variants of Self-Coordination"

Box 32   Folder 12

The Logic of Liberty, Lecture 6, "Polycentricity"

Box 32   Folder 13

The Logic of Liberty, Lecture 7, "Critique of Freedom"

Box 32   Folder 14

The Logic of Liberty, Miscellaneous manuscripts and notes

Box 32   Folder 15

Miscellaneous short manuscripts and untitled manuscripts

  • Review of Max Planck, Scientific Autobiography and Other Papers
  • The Scientific Concept of Man
  • Review of Barbara Wooton, Testament for Social Science
  • "But there is a more serious sense..."

Subseries 15: 1951

Box 33   Folder 1

Manuscripts used in the Gifford Lectures. Notebooks 1-3

Box 33   Folder 2

Manuscripts used in the Gifford Lectures, The Law, 1942

Box 33   Folder 3

Manuscripts used in the Gifford Lectures, The Law, 1942

Box 33   Folder 4

Manuscripts used in the Gifford Lectures, Meaning, 1947, and The Structure of Liberalism, 1945

Box 33   Folder 5

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Review of David Mitrany, Marx Against the Peasant
  • Review of Karl Mannheim, Freedom, Power and Democratic Planning
  • Review of Ernest Barker, Principles of Social and Political Theory
  • Salvation by Science

Subseries 16: 1952

Box 33   Folder 6

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Review of Alex Weissberg, Conspiracy of Silence
  • Review of Karl Mannheim, Essays on the Sociology of Knowledge
  • Review of Bertrand Russell, The Impact of Science on Society
  • Morphological Sciences
  • Review of Erwin Schrödinger, Science and Humanism
  • The Stability of Beliefs
Box 33   Folder 7

The Policy of Full Employment

Subseries 17: 1953

Box 33   Folder 8

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Review of F. A. Hayek, The Counter-Revolution of Science
  • The Determinants of Social Action (revised)
  • Review of Robert Strauz-Hupé, The Estrangement of Western Man
  • Protests and Problems
  • Review of Bernard Barber, Science and the Social Order
  • Review of Jules Monnerat, Sociology of Communism
  • Soziale Illusionen

Subseries 18: 1954

Box 33   Folder 9

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Review of Arthur Koestler, Invisible Writing
  • Review of Ralph Barton Perry, Realms of Value
  • Review of J. Robert Oppenheimer, Science and the Common Understanding
  • Review of A. J. H. Sprott, Science and Social Action

Subseries 19: 1955, 1956, 1957

Box 33   Folder 10

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Review of Gabriel A. Almond, The Appeals of Communism (1955)
  • From Copernicus to Einstein (1955)
  • The Future of Liberalism in Eastern Europe (1957)
  • Hydrogen Bomb (1957)
  • The Magic of Marxism (1956)
  • On the Limits of Economic Planning (1955)
  • Social Control: Visible and Invisible (1957)
  • Review of V. G. Childe, Society and Knowledge (1956)
  • Study Group of the Committee for Science and Freedom (1956)
  • Die Stunde der Wahrheit (1956)
  • This Age of Discovery (1956)
  • Words, Conceptions and Science (1955)

Subseries 20: 1958

Box 33   Folder 11

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • The Outlook of Science: Its Sickness and Cure
  • Positive Liberalism
Box 33   Folder 12

Das Studium des Menschen

Subseries 21: 1959

Box 33   Folder 13

Miscellaneous short manuscripts and untitled manuscripts

  • Questions for an Inquiry into the Nature of Soviet Planning
  • "I would like to say that..."
  • "The ideas which I want to sketch here..."

Subseries 22: 1960

Box 34   Folder 1

Perspectives of Personal Knowledge, The Gunning Lectures, Lecture 1, "Logical Foundations"

Box 34   Folder 2

Perspectives of Personal Knowledge, Lecture 2, "Originality"

Box 34   Folder 3

Perspectives of Personal Knowledge, Lecture 3, "Emergence and Reflection"

Box 34   Folder 4

Perspectives of Personal Knowledge, Lecture 4, "Social Structure and Alienation, Commitment"

Box 34   Folder 5

Perspectives of Personal Knowledge, Lecture 5, "The Process of History"

Box 34   Folder 6

Miscellaneous manuscripts and notes Beyond Nihilism

Box 34   Folder 7

Miscellaneous manuscripts and notes Beyond Nihilism

Box 34   Folder 8

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Review of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, The Phenomenon of Man
  • Rede von Professor Michael Polanyi auf der Schlusssitzung
  • The Study of Man
  • Theory of Conspicuous Productions
Box 34   Folder 9

Originality (revised)

Box 34   Folder 10

Personal Judgment in Science

Box 34   Folder 11

Science, Academic and Industrial (revised)

Box 34   Folder 12

Science and Reality

Box 34   Folder 13

St. Julians, March 1960

Box 34   Folder 14

The Structure of Tacit Knowing (early draft)

Subseries 23: 1961

Box 34   Folder 15

History and Hope, lectures delivered at the Thomas Jefferson Center for studies in political economy at the University of Virginia

Box 34   Folder 16

Beyond Nihilism, A Postscript

Subseries 24: 1962

Box 34   Folder 17

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Conspicuous Production (revised)
  • My Time with X-Rays and Crystals
Box 35   Folder 1

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects (the stage of 11 May 1962), Chapter 2, "The Realm of the Unspoken"

Box 35   Folder 2

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Chapter 3, "The Vindication of Reality"

Box 35   Folder 3

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Chapter 4, "Emergence"

Box 35   Folder 4

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Chapter 5, "A Society of Explorers"

Box 35   Folder 5

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Chapter 6, "Commitment"

Box 35   Folder 6

Terry Lectures as delivered at Yale University, October 31-November 3, 1962, (Much of this material was revised for the 1964 Duke University Lectures) Lecture 1, first half, "Tacit Knowing"

Box 35   Folder 7

Terry Lectures as delivered at Yale University, Lecture 1, first half, "Tacit Knowing" (with 1963 revisions)

Box 35   Folder 8

Terry Lectures as delivered at Yale University, Lecture 1, first half, "Tacit Knowing" (with 1963 revisions)

Box 35   Folder 9

Terry Lectures as delivered at Yale University, Lecture 1, first half, "Tacit Knowing" (with 1963 revisions)

Box 35   Folder 10

Terry Lectures as delivered at Yale University, Lecture 1, part 2, "Tacit Knowing: Heuristics" (1963 revision)

Box 35   Folder 11

Terry Lectures as delivered at Yale University, Lecture 2, "Comprehensive Entities" (with 1963 revision entitled, "Emergence")

Box 35   Folder 12

Terry Lectures as delivered at Yale University, Lecture 3, "Man in Thought" (with 1963 revision entitled, "Thought in Society")

Subseries 25: 1963

Box 35   Folder 13

Tacit Knowing (a version of the first Terry Lecture revised for publication)

Box 35   Folder 14

Tacit Knowing (a version of the first Terry Lecture revised for publication)

Box 35   Folder 15

The Metaphysical Aspects of Science (early draft)

Box 36   Folder 1

The Metaphysical Reach of Science (early draft)

Box 36   Folder 2

The Metaphysical Reach of Science (early draft)

Box 36   Folder 3

Points from a Conversation with Paul Tillich

Subseries 26: 1964

Box 36   Folder 4

Man in Thought, lectures delivered at Duke University, Lecture 1, "The Metaphysical Reach of Science" (lecture copy)

Box 36   Folder 5

Man in Thought, Lecture 1, "The Metaphysical Reach of Science" Mimeograph and carbon copies

Box 36   Folder 6

Man in Thought, Lecture 1, "The Metaphysical Reach of Science" Corrected carbons

Box 36   Folder 7

Man in Thought, Lecture 1, "The Metaphysical Reach of Science" Adapted to book format

Box 36   Folder 8

Man in Thought, Lecture 1, "The Metaphysical Reach of Science" Miscellaneous manuscripts and notes

Box 36   Folder 9

Man in Thought, Lecture 2, "The Structure of Tacit Knowing" Two copies used in lecture

Box 36   Folder 10

Man in Thought, Lecture 2, "The Structure of Tacit Knowing" Mimeograph and carbon copies

Box 36   Folder 11

Man in Thought, Lecture 2, "The Structure of Tacit Knowing" As delivered in Chicago, 1967

Box 36   Folder 12

Man in Thought, Lecture 2, "The Structure of Tacit Knowing" Adapted to book format

Box 36   Folder 13

Man in Thought, Lecture 3, "Commitment to Science" Copy used in lecture

Box 36   Folder 14

Man in Thought, Lecture 3, "Commitment to Science" Mimeograph copies

Box 36   Folder 15

Man in Thought, Lecture 3, "Commitment to Science" Adapted to book format

Box 36   Folder 16

Man in Thought, Lecture 4, "The Emergence of Man" Copy used in lecture

Box 36   Folder 17

Man in Thought, Lecture 4, "The Emergence of Man" Mimeograph copies

Box 37   Folder 1

Man in Thought, Lecture 5, "Thought in Society" Copy used in lecture

Box 37   Folder 2

Man in Thought, Lecture 5, "Thought in Society" Mimeograph copies

Box 37   Folder 3

Man in Thought, Lecture 5, "Thought in Society" Adapted to book format (entitled, "Chapter 3, The Powers of the Imagination")

Box 37   Folder 4

Notes for a projected sixth Duke Lecture on "Ultimate Reality"

Box 37   Folder 5

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects (1964 revision) Chapter 1, "The Destruction of Reality"

Box 37   Folder 6

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Chapter 2, "The Realm of the Unspoken"

Box 37   Folder 7

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Chapter 3, "The Vindication of Reality"

Box 37   Folder 8

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Chapter 4, "Emergence"

Box 37   Folder 9

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Chapter 5, "A Society of Explorers"

Box 37   Folder 10

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Chapter 6, "Commitment"

Box 37   Folder 11

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Lecture delivered at Bowdoin College

Box 37   Folder 12

Miscellaneous short manuscripts and untitled manuscripts

  • About Religious Faith
  • Grounds of Knowledge
  • Modern Minds-New Departures
  • Notes to Ultimate Reality
  • On Body and Mind
  • Tacit Affiliations
  • "Let me explore this vision..."
Box 37   Folder 13

Science, Tacit and Explicit

Subseries 27: 1965

Box 37   Folder 14

The Body-Mind Relation

Box 37   Folder 15

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Wesleyan Lectures, Lecture 1, "Science and Reality"

Box 37   Folder 16

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Lecture 2, "The Structure of Tacit Knowing"

Box 38   Folder 1

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Lecture 3, "The Creative Imagination," (also entitled "Man in Thought," and "Powers of the Imagination")

Box 38   Folder 2

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Lecture 3, "The Creative Imagination," (also entitled "Man in Thought," and "Powers of the Imagination")

Box 38   Folder 3

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Lecture 4, "The Growth of Science in Society," and Lecture 5, "Levels of Reality"

Box 38   Folder 4

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Miscellaneous manuscripts and notes

Box 38   Folder 5

The Modern Mind; Its Structure and Prospects, Bound copy of six lectures

Box 38   Folder 6

Man in Search of Meaning

Subseries 28: 1966

Box 38   Folder 7

The Growth of Science in Society

Box 38   Folder 8

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • Autobiography by Michael Polanyi (for Mid-Century Authors)
  • Collection of Data on Cultural Development
  • The Message of the Hungarian Revolution
  • Opening Address, Niebuhr Celebration, New York, Feb 25, 1966
Box 38   Folder 9

Sinngebung and Sinndeutung

Subseries 29: 1967

Box 38   Folder 10

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • On the Structure of Living Things
  • Sense-Giving and Sense Reading, Of Language
  • Sixty Years in Universities
  • What is a Painting?

Subseries 30: 1968

Box 38   Folder 11

The Grounds of Knowledge and Discovery, Manuscript and notes

Box 38   Folder 12

Logic and Psychology

Box 39   Folder 1

The Meaning of Paintings

Box 39   Folder 2

Miscellaneous short manuscripts

  • About Revolutions Already Forgotten
  • Life's Irreducible Structure
Box 39   Folder 3

Seminars in the Committee on Social Thought, the University of Chicago, Spring, 1968, Bound copy

Subseries 31: 1969

Box 39   Folder 4

Grounds of Knowledge (Heidelburg revision)

Box 39   Folder 5

Grounds of Knowledge (1973 and 1974 revisions)

Box 39   Folder 6

Meaning, A Project, Lectures and seminars at the University of Chicago, Lecture 1, "From Perception to Metaphor"

Box 39   Folder 7

Meaning, A Project, Lecture 2, "Works of Art"

Box 39   Folder 8

Meaning, A Project, Lecture 2, "Works of Art," notes

Box 39   Folder 9

Meaning, A Project, Lecture 2, "Works of Art," notes

Box 39   Folder 10

Meaning, A Project, Lecture 3, "Visionary Art"

Box 39   Folder 11

Meaning, A Project, Lecture 4, "Myths, Ancient and Modern"

Box 40   Folder 1

Meaning, A Project, Supplemental materials

Box 40   Folder 2

Meaning, a book adapted from Chicago materials by Michael Polanyi and Harry Prosch, Outline and Chapters 1-3

Box 40   Folder 3

Meaning, Chapters 4-9

Box 40   Folder 4

Meaning, Chapters 10-13

Box 40   Folder 5

Meaning, Copy Two, Chapters 1-3

Box 40   Folder 6

Meaning, Copy Two, Chapters 4-8

Box 40   Folder 7

Meaning, Copy Two, Chapters 9-13

Box 40   Folder 8

Meaning, Fragments

Box 40   Folder 9

Meaning, bound copy of seminars given in the Committee on Social Thought, the University of Chicago, Spring, 1969

Subseries 32: 1970

Box 41   Folder 1

Meaning, Draft of a lecture dated May 1970

Box 41   Folder 2

Meaning, Draft of a lecture dated May 1970

Box 41   Folder 3

Science and Man, Nuffield Lecture also delivered at Loyola University of Chicago

Subseries 33: 1971

Box 41   Folder 4

Lectures delivered at the University of Texas at Austin, Lecture 1, "Science and Man," (revised version of Nuffield and Loyola lectures)

Box 41   Folder 5

Lectures delivered at the University of Texas at Austin, Lecture 2, "Genius in Science"

Box 41   Folder 6

Lectures delivered at the University of Texas at Austin, Lecture 2, "Genius in Science"

Box 41   Folder 7

Lectures delivered at the University of Texas at Austin, Lecture 3, "Representative Art"

Box 41   Folder 8

Lectures delivered at the University of Texas at Austin, Lecture 3, "Representative Art"

Box 41   Folder 9

Lectures delivered at the University of Texas at Austin, Lecture 4, "Meaning," and Lecture 5, "Expanding the Range"

Box 41   Folder 10

The Grounds of Natural Science

Subseries 34: 1972

Box 41   Folder 11

About Religious Faith (revised manuscript with notes)

Subseries 35: Undated

Box 42   Folder 1

Untitled essays written between 1935 and 1940 on various subjects

Box 42   Folder 2

Untitled essays written between 1935 and 1940 on various subjects

Box 42   Folder 3

Untitled essays written between 1935 and 1940 on various subjects

Box 42   Folder 4

Untitled essays written between 1935 and 1940 on various subjects

Box 42   Folder 5

Clues towards an Understanding of Mind and Body and a Cycle of History

Box 42   Folder 6

Discoveries of Science

Box 42   Folder 7

Emergence

Box 42   Folder 8

Foundations of Science and Discovery

Box 42   Folder 9

Honor and Mutual Authority

Box 42   Folder 10

Lines of Thought

Box 42   Folder 11

Meaning

Box 42   Folder 12

Science and Reality

Box 42   Folder 13

Part 1 of a presentation on economic productivity

Box 42   Folder 14

Part 1 of a presentation on economic productivity

Box 43   Folder 1

Fragments

Box 43   Folder 2

Fragments

Box 43   Folder 3

German scientific manuscripts

Box 43   Folder 4

German scientific manuscripts

Box 43   Folder 5

Speeches of introduction and thanks

Box 43   Folder 6

Patents

Box 43   Folder 7

Laboratory financial expenditures

Box 43   Folder 8

Poetry

Box 43   Folder 9

German translation of Personal Knowledge

Box 43   Folder 10

German translation of Personal Knowledge

Box 43   Folder 11

German translation of Personal Knowledge

Box 43   Folder 12

German translation of Personal Knowledge

Box 43   Folder 13

German translation of Personal Knowledge

Box 43   Folder 14

German translation of Personal Knowledge

Box 43   Folder 15

German translation of Personal Knowledge

Subseries 36: Notebooks, Travel Diaries, and Bibliographies

Box 44   Folder 1

Notebook, Summer, 1926

Box 44   Folder 2

Notebook, 1925-1928

Box 44   Folder 3

Notebook, "Trip to America," 1929

Box 44   Folder 4

Diary-1929

Box 44   Folder 5

Notebook, "Berlin Visit," Nov 27-Dec 3, 1947

Box 44   Folder 6

Notebook, various subjects (undated)

Box 44   Folder 7

Notebook containing undated obsolete index to correspondence files

Box 44   Folder 8

Notebook, "Books and Papers Lent Out to Fellow Workers"; Notebook, Notes, Aug-Oct 1963, mainly about Dewey

Box 44   Folder 9

Bibliographic Citations

Box 44   Folder 10

Bibliographic Citations

Box 44   Folder 11

Bibliographic Citations

Box 44   Folder 12

Bibliographic Citations

Series IV: Offprints and Memorabilia

Memorabilia in the Polanyi Papers falls into five groups: photographs and postcards; personal materials (addresses, announcements, Christmas cards, invitations, obituaries, programs, receipts, reports, etc.); miscellaneous clippings and multi-media; offprints by Michael Polanyi; and offprints by other authors and other secondary published works, including photocopied records of Polanyi's collection of books.

The photographs are of Michael Polanyi, his family and friends. If known, the name of the subject is indicated on the back of the print. The clippings include letters and articles by Michael Polanyi, as well as reviews of Polanyi's work, dissertations which address Polanyi's thought, and articles by Polanyi's mother Cecile (mostly copies of her fashion column in a Budapest newspaper). Other items include a small group of clippings and other printed materials from the German National Socialist period, as well as taped and filmed interviews with Polanyi. This collection also holds offprints and some privately distributed lecture material by Michael Polanyi. Offprints by other authors which remain in this collection have been annotated by Polanyi, or bear holograph inscriptions by their original authors. Finally, this collection holds six volumes of bound photocopies of the title pages of the books in Polanyi's collection, which were dispersed in 1994.

Subseries 1: Photographs and Postcards

Box 45   Folder 1

Photographs

Box 45   Folder 2

Photographs

Box 45   Folder 3

Photographs

Box 45   Folder 4

Photographs

Box 45   Folder 5

Postcards

Box 45   Folder 6

Scrapbook of photographs, Conference at Mont Pélerin, April 1947

Subseries 2: General Memorabilia

Box 46   Folder 1

Addresses

Box 46   Folder 2

Announcements

Box 46   Folder 3

Announcements

Box 46   Folder 4

Christmas cards

Box 46   Folder 5

Christmas cards

Box 46   Folder 6

Invitations

Box 46   Folder 7

Obituaries

Box 46   Folder 8

Programs

Box 46   Folder 9

Receipts

Box 46   Folder 10

Reports

Box 46   Folder 11

Miscellaneous

Subseries 3: Clippings

Box 47   Folder 1

Letters and articles by Michael Polanyi

Box 47   Folder 2

Reviews of Michael Polanyi's work

Box 47   Folder 3

Reviews of Michael Polanyi's work

Box 47   Folder 4

Articles about Michael Polanyi

Box 47   Folder 5

Articles concerning the withholding of Michael Polanyi's visa under the McCarran Act

Box 47   Folder 6

Articles by Cecile Polanyi

Box 47   Folder 7

Articles by Cecile Polanyi

Box 47   Folder 8

Articles by Cecile Polanyi

Box 47   Folder 9

Articles by Cecile Polanyi

Box 47   Folder 10

Printed materials from the German National Socialist period

Box 47   Folder 11

Printed materials from the German National Socialist period

Box 47   Folder 12

Elizabeth Sewell, Memoir of Michael Polanyi

Box 47   Folder 13

Elizabeth Sewell, "Three Tales of Love and Death," typescript, and various poems, typescripts, 1956-1970

Box 48   Folder 1

Sam Watson, Jr., "Michael Polanyi; A Grounding for Inventional Theory in Contemporary Rhetoric," dissertation prospectus, 1972

Box 48   Folder 2

Paul Wilczak, dissertation prospectus for research on Michael Polanyi, 1971

Box 48   Folder 3

Paul Wilczak, "Science, Faith, and Human Motivation; An Interpretation of the Thought of Michael Polanyi," Ph.D dissertation

Box 48   Folder 4

Reel-to-reel tape recording of interview with Michael Polanyi

Box 48   Folder 5

Reel-to-reel tape (contents unknown)

Box 48   Folder 6

Microfilm roll of prints by Michael Polanyi, deposited at the Library of Duke University, North Carolina

Box 49   Folder 1

Michael Polanyi, "Our Daily Work," (film script) 1935

Box 49   Folder 2

Michael Polanyi, 1935/36

Box 49   Folder 3

Michael Polanyi, 1936, with related correspondence

Box 49   Folder 4

Videotape copy of film, Unemployment and Money, 1938

  • This item has been reformatted for access.

Subseries 4: Offprints, works by Michael Polanyi

Box 50   Folder 1

1914-1935

Box 50   Folder 2

1935-1941

Box 50   Folder 3

1942-1944

Box 50   Folder 4

1945

Box 50   Folder 5

1946-1947

Box 50   Folder 6

1947-1948

Box 51   Folder 1

1951

Box 51   Folder 2

1952-1955

Box 51   Folder 3

1956-1958

Box 51   Folder 4

1961

Box 51   Folder 5

1962-1963

Box 52   Folder 1

1964

Box 52   Folder 2

1964 (International Congress for Logic, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science, Jerusalem, 1964, Program and Abstracts)

Box 52   Folder 3

1965-1966

Box 52   Folder 4

1966-1968

Box 52   Folder 5

1968 (Materials used in four seminars held by Michael Polanyi, University of Chicago, Spring 1968)

Box 52   Folder 6

1969-1974

Subseries 5: Offprints by Other Authors

Box 53   Folder 1

A

Box 53   Folder 2

B

Box 53   Folder 3

C

Box 53   Folder 4

D

Box 53   Folder 5

E

Box 53   Folder 6

F

Box 53   Folder 7

G

Box 54   Folder 1

H

Box 54   Folder 2

I

Box 54   Folder 3

J

Box 54   Folder 4

K

Box 54   Folder 5

L

Box 54   Folder 6

M

Box 55   Folder 1

M, cont.

Box 55   Folder 2

N

Box 55   Folder 3

O-P

Box 55   Folder 4

P

Box 55   Folder 5

P, cont.

Box 55   Folder 6

Q-R

Box 55   Folder 7

S

Box 56   Folder 1

S, cont.

Box 56   Folder 2

T

Box 56   Folder 3

V

Box 56   Folder 4

W

Box 56   Folder 5

Z

Subseries 6: Michael Polanyi Library, photocopied title pages of Polanyi’s library, dispersed July 1994

Box 57   Volume 1

Unnumbered, and nos. 1-100

Box 57   Volume 2

nos. 101-399

Box 57   Volume 3

nos. 400-699

Box 57   Volume 4

nos. 700-954

Box 58   Volume 5

Unnumbered volumes

Box 58   Volume 6

Unnumbered volumes

Reel 1

Film reel, Les Matinées de Michael Polanyi, (Savants IV) (oversize)

Box 60    Folder 1

Five demonstration posters of the Ptolemaic and Copernican versions of the solar system (evidently derived from Polanyi's chapter, "Science and Reality," in Science, Faith and Society, 1946) (oversize)

Box 60    Folder 2

Five demonstration posters of the Ptolemaic and Copernican versions of the solar system (evidently derived from Polanyi's chapter, "Science and Reality," in Science, Faith and Society, 1946) (oversize)

Box 60    Folder 3

Five demonstration posters of the Ptolemaic and Copernican versions of the solar system (evidently derived from Polanyi's chapter, "Science and Reality," in Science, Faith and Society, 1946) (oversize)

Box 60    Folder 4

Five demonstration posters of the Ptolemaic and Copernican versions of the solar system (evidently derived from Polanyi's chapter, "Science and Reality," in Science, Faith and Society, 1946) (oversize)

Box 60    Folder 5

Five demonstration posters of the Ptolemaic and Copernican versions of the solar system (evidently derived from Polanyi's chapter, "Science and Reality," in Science, Faith and Society, 1946) (oversize)