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Middle East Photos | Pharaonic Monuments in Lower Egypt

Pharaonic Monuments in Lower Egypt

Giza


Lekegian, ca. 1885. Negative inscribed "Sphinx de Ghizeh. No. 10." Albumen. Unmounted. 11 x 8 inches. Acquisition number 90-85.


Sebah, ca. 1870. Negative inscribed "(Mus. Ghiseh) Fils Royal Ra Hotep & Dame Nefer Ta. 119." Albumen. Mounted. 10.5 x 8.5 inches. Acquisition number 96-85.


Sebah, ca. 1870. Negative inscribed "Sphenx & Pyramide Chegran. 263." Albumen. Mounted. 10.5 x 8.5 inches. Acquisition number 112-85.


Sebah, ca. 1870. Negative inscribed "228. Pyramide Cheops." Albumen. Mounted. 10.5 x 8.5 inches. Acquisition number 114-85.


Lekegian, ca. 1885. Negative inscribed "No. 9A. (Ghizeh) Pyramide, Sphinx & Temple." Albumen. Mounted. 10.5 x 8 inches. Acquisition number 125-85.


Zangaki, ca. 1865. Negative inscribed "No. 436. Vue generale des Pyramides." Albumen. Mounted. 11 x 8.5 inches. Acquisition number 162-85.


Identified in ink on reverse: "Pyramids de Giseh." Description in pencil on reverse: "View on the Nile near Cairo, showing a Mud Villiage [sic], Cheops, and the Pyramid of Sensuphis, or Sen-Saohpis, or Cephren, or Nef-Chofo. The latter stands on higher ground than Cheops so that at a distance it has the appearance of being the higher of the two. A portion near the peak has not had the outer layer of polished granite removed, as will be seen in the picture. When entire, the length of each side was about 707 3/4 ft. and hight [sic] 454 ft. 3 in. The ruler whose name it bears was a brother or son of Cheops and his successors." Signed: "Joseph Moore, Jr., Grand New Hotel, Cairo, Dec. 31, 1877." Acquisition number 357-93.


Identified in ink on reverse: "Sphinx." Description in pencil on reverse: "View of the Sphinx at Ghizeh, near Cairo. It stands in front of the second pyramid and it is probable that at one time there were two of these monsters, one on each side of the approach to the pyramidical tomb. It is therefore, perhaps, of the same age as the pyramids. The Sphinx has on its forehead the Sacred Asp, the usual mark of royalty which kings wore in gold tied on by the diadem. The shape of the skull is similar to that of the people of the Delta. Dating from the time of Sensuphis, or Sen Saophis, or Cephren, or Nef-Chofo, whose pyramid it is presumed to ornament, the Sphinx was probably carved out of the rock between 1700 and 1600 B.C. The head, shoulders and back are now alone visible above the sand, but when the whole leonine body is exposed it shows a length of about 140 ft. with the forepaws extending an additional 50 ft. in front. The hight [sic], according to Pliny, is 143 ft., and the circumference of the forehead 102 ft. When first exhumed a paved enclosed place was found between the paws in which an altar, three tablets, a lion and some fragments were found. The Sphinx was held by the Egyptians as emblematical of the king, or a union of intellectual and physical force. The title given to the Sphinx was Hor-em-Khoo, meaning the Sun in the resting place, and it was worshipped as a local deity." Signed: "Joseph Moore, Jr., Grand New Hotel, Cairo, Dec. 31, 1877." Acquisition number 358-93.

Heliopolis


Zangaki, ca. 1865. Negative inscribed "No. 462. Obelisque de Heliopolis." Albumen. Mounted. 11 x 8.5 inches. Acquisition number 102-85.


Identified in ink on reverse: "Obelisk Heliopolis." Description in pencil on reverse: "View of the Obelisk near the villiage [sic] of Matareeah, which marks the sight of ancient Heliopolis. This shaft is of red granite from the quarries of Syene, and it is the oldest in Egypt. It is supposed to have been set up by Osirtasen, or Osirtesen I., who was the founder of the XIIth dynasty, and probably reigned about 3000 B.C. The sides are not exactly square, the measurements at the base being 6 ft. 1 in. and 6 ft. 3 in., while the total hight [sic] is 68 ft. 2 in. About 6 ft. of the length is imbedded in the sand. The remnants of an avenue of sphinxes and other relics have been removed to the Cairo Museum. The hieroglyphics on two sides are filled with wasps nests, as the picture shows. Heliopolis was in the heart of the Land of Goshen and at its famous Temple of the Sun Moses studied theology. Not far from the obelisk is the sycamore known as the 'Virgin's Tree' under which the Holy Family rested on the Flight to Egypt." Signed: "Joseph Moore, Jr., Grand New Hotel, Cairo, Dec. 29, 1877." Acquisition number 355-93.

Saqqara


Identified in ink on reverse: "Pyramid de Saquarah." Description in pencil on reverse: "View of the largest of the Pyramids of Sakkarah, believed to be one of the oldest in Egypt. The name of its builder is not yet settled, but is supposed to be Ouenephes, the fourth king of the first dynasty. It is built in stages, as shown in the picture, and its base is not a perfect square. This pyramid is the largest of a group of eleven and it is in a badly ruined condition. The present hight [sic] is 190 ft. and the base 351 x 394 ft. When first opened in 1821 thirty mummies were found within it. Not far from the pyramids is the remains of the Serapeum, a great temple of Memphis, under which is the Apis Mausoleum, or tomb of the sacred bulls. Close by this again are the Tomb of Tih and the Tomb of Phtah-Hotep. All these are the remains of ancient Memphis." Signed: "Joseph Moore, Jr., Steamer Mehallah, Jan. 9, 1878." Acquisition number 356-93.


© 1996 Middle East Department. Joseph Regenstein Library. The University of Chicago.