Title:

Kale Williams papers

Identifier:

BMRC.CHM.WILLIAMS

Repository:

Chicago History Museum

Extent:

6.26 Linear feet

Dates:

1950-2008

Abstract:

Kale Williams (1925- ) is a devout Quaker, pacifist, human rights activist, U.S. Navy and World War II veteran, and University of Chicago alumni. After his service in World War II, Williams began a career with the American Friends Service Committee and in 1968 led an international team of Quakers to both Nigeria and Biafra during the countries’ civil war to provide food and medical services. In 1966, Williams worked closely with Martin Luther King Jr. through his involvement in the Chicago Freedom Movement. In 1972, Williams became the executive director of the Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities. In 1994, he was invited to Loyola University Chicago as Visiting Professor of Applied Ethics, and was appointed Senior Scholar in Loyola’s Center for Urban Research and Learning two years later.

Processing Information note

Processed by CLIR funded Black Metropolis Research Consortium “Color Curtain Processing Project.” Processors: Katie Obriot and Elise Zerega

Restrictions

Research use of this collection is governed by the standard rules and regulations of the Chicago History Museum Research Center.

Conditions Governing Use note

The collection is open for research use.

Related Archival Materials note

Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities Records, Chicago History Museum

Biographical/Historical note

Kale Williams was born in 1925 in Cedar Vale, Kansas. He served in the United States Navy during World War II. His experiences in war had a direct impact on his embracement of pacifism. In 1951, he began working with the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC), a Quaker service organization based in Chicago. In 1958, he became the head of the Midwest office of the AFSC. The AFSC was heavily involved in the Chicago Freedom Movement, also referred to as the Chicago Open Housing Movement, and Williams – a member of the Freedom Movement’s Agenda Committee – worked closely with Martin Luther King Jr. during that time. From 1968 to 1970, Williams led an international Quaker team providing food and medical services to both Nigeria and Biafra during their civil war. In 1972, he became the executive director of the Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities (LCMOC), the fair housing organization that was a direct outgrowth of the Chicago Freedom Movement. The LCMOC worked with investigators and lawyers on housing discrimination issues in Chicago. In 1994, Williams was invited to Loyola University Chicago as Visiting Professor of Applied Ethics. In 1996, he was appointed Senior Scholar in Loyola’s Center for Urban Research and Learning and held that position until 2011.

Cited Sources

Middlebury, “Chicago Freedom Movement,” 2010, http://cfm40.middlebury.edu/node/17. Accessed on February 25, 2013. Kale Williams Papers (Chicago History Museum), biographical sketch, undated, box 15/folder 189.

Arrangement note

The Kale Williams collection is arranged into five series, one of which has been further arranged in subseries. The collection is arranged in the original order in which it was accessioned. Materials are arranged by topic within each series. The series and subseries arrangement of the records is as follows:

Series 1. American Friends Service Committee, circa 1950-1993

Series 2. Chicago Public Housing, 1966-2008, bulk 1994-1999 Subseries 1. Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open communities, circa 1966-2008 Subseries 2. Dialogue group, 1994-2003, bulk 1997-1999 Subseries 3. Housing Mobility Conference, 1987-1998, bulk 1993-1994

Series 3. Chicago Freeedom Movement, 1966-2006

Series 4. Personal papers, 1959-2004

Series 5. Subject, files, 1964-1996

Scope and Contents note

The Kale Williams collection spans from 1954 to 2006 and includea reports on housing inequality and Chicago public housing, correspondence, briefings, writings, and newspaper clippings.

Preferred Citation note

Please cite this collection as: Kale Williams (Chicago History Museum) plus a detailed description, date, and box/folder number of a specific item.

Subjects

INVENTORY

Series I. American Friends Service Committee, circa 1950-1993

Scope and Contents note

The American Friends Service Committee consists of materials from the 1966 Chicago Freedom Movement of which the Chicago branch of the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) were involved. The materials include reports, statements, and briefings given by Kale Williams to the AFSC regarding equal housing and civil rights of African Americans. Materials also include the AFSC’s Institutional Service Units, which aided students pursuing careers in the social sciences, as well as the aid work organized by Williams in South Africa.

Press, 1973-1974

Institutional Service Unit, 1954-1956

Philosophy and direction of the Committee, 1978-1980

Quaker Youth Service Program, 1978-1979

South Africa, 1977-1978

South Africa, 1976-1978

Quaker Service in Nigeria, 1967-1978

Quaker-Mennonite Service Report, 1970

Press, statements, public relations, reports, 1960-1963, 1966-1968, 1972, 1975

Reports, 1966, 1973, undated

New Society Working Party, 1968-1973

Planning Committee, 1991, 1993

Kale Williams’ Notes 1979, 1982, 1986, 1988, undated

Williams’ Notes on his visit to Visit to Longport, Indiana Mental Institute, undated

Chicago Interns-In-Industry, 1950

Organizational mission, 1953, 1964, 1968, 1971

Speaker resources and notes, 1959-1969, undated

The Urban Training Center Newsletter, 1971

Pacifism and non-violence, undated

Critique of American Friends Service Committee, 1978-1979

Correspondence, circa 1958-1973, undated

Chicago Freedom Movement research, 1963, 1966

Institutional Service Units, 1955-1956

American Friends Service Committee, national materials, 1956-1977

Peace Committee, 1968, 1970

Chicago housing, undated

Southern Christian Leadership Conference, 1968

Chicago housing, 1966

Series II. Chicago Public Housing, Bulk, 1994-1999

Scope and Contents note

The Chicago Public Housing series consists of material related to Kale Williams’s involvement and interest in Chicago public housing.

Arrangement note

The Chicago Public Housing series is arranged in three subseries as follows:

Subseries 1. Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open communities, circa 1966-2008 Subseries 2. Dialogue group, 1994-2003, bulk 1997-1999 Subseries 3. Housing Mobility Conference, 1987-1998, bulk 1993-1994

Subseries 1. Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities circa 1966-2008

Scope and Contents note

Williams was director of the Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities (LCMOC) from 1972 to 1992. He remained active with the organization after his retirement. The LCMOC fought for fair housing in Chicago, most notably as a part of the Supreme Court case Hills v. Gautreaux, which found the Chicago Housing Authority and Department of Housing and Urban Development guilty of racial discrimination with regards to Chicago’s public housing. Documents include reports and studies about housing inequality conducted by the LCMOC, writings about Chicago housing, newspaper clippings about the LCMOC, and correspondence.

Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities, 1975, 2000

Kale William articles, 1987-1992

Leadership Council publications and clippings, 1991-1993

Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities, 1992

The John Marshall Law Review: A Fair Housing Symposium, 1992

Newspaper clippings, 1998, undated

Reports on housing discrimination, 1979-1980

“The Segregation of Opportunities: The Structure of Advantage and Disadvantage in the Chicago Region,” 2005

Report to the Chicago Community Trust and the Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities, 1990

Reports and publications, circa 1991-2003

Retirement letters in bound book, 1992

Leadership Council reports and studies, circa 1966-1992

Gautreaux case, circa 2000-2008

Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities, circa 1981-2004

Subseries 2. Dialogue Group Bulk, 1997-1999

Scope and Contents note

The Dialogue Group worked to provide support for residents who had to be relocated during the Chicago Housing Authority’s “Plan for Transformation,” which included the demolition of a number of public housing buildings. It was comprised of the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA), CHAC Inc. (Housing Choice Voucher Program), Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Chicago Department of Housing, Business and Professional People for Public Interest, Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities, Family Dynamics, Housing Choice Partners, Latinos United, and the Metropolitan Planning Council. Materials include reports, consulting agreements, programs, and informational packets.

Recommendations to relocation of families from Chicago Housing AuthoritybBuildings who choose Section 8 housing choice vouchers, 1997

Recommended Procedures for relocation of families from Chicago Housing Authority buildings who choose Section 8 housing choice vouchers, 1999

Recommended forms and form letters for relocation from Chicago Housing Authority buildings of families who choose Section 8 vouchers, 1999

Leadership Council: Housing relocation and family counseling program forms and consulting agreements, circa 1994-1999

CHAC briefing packets, reports, and guidebooks, 1997-1999

Quality housing and Work Responsibility Act Summary; CHA Relocation Notice Letter, 1998

Chicago Housing Authority Section 8 Program: "Barriers to Successful Leasing Up,” 1999

Family Dynamic, Inc., 1997-1999

Residential materials: "How Bronzeville’s Chicago Housing Authority resident families view their community and homes," 1999

Dialogue Group Agreement, 1999

Housing Choice Partners, 1999

Temporary relocation, Permanent Choice: Serving families with rent vouchers during the Chicago Housing Authority “Plan for Transformation,” 2003

Subseries 3. Housing Mobility Conference, Bulk, 1993-1994

Scope and Contents note

In 1994, Williams helped conduct the first national Housing Mobility Conference. He wrote a conference paper with George E. Peterson titled, “Housing Mobility: What Has It Accomplished and What Is Its Promise?,” which analyzed case studies of various housing mobility programs throughout the United States. Included in the subseries are handwritten and typed notes by Williams, drafts of the paper, correspondence, and publications concerned with public housing.

“Residential Satisfaction in Scattered-Site Public Housing Projects” 1987

Housing Mobility Conference Contracts 1994

Housing Mobility Conference-Additions for Final Draft 1994

Housing Mobility Conference-Opposition 1994

Proposed Section 8 Legislation; CIR-Section 8 Reform 1994

Housing Mobility Conference Planning Committee 1994

Housing Mobility Conference Conference Agenda 1994

Housing Mobility Conference Notes and Contracts 1994

Research Proposal 1993-1994

Housing Mobility Conference Drafts 1994

Housing Mobility Conference-Addition Sites 1994

Alameda County 1994

Housing Mobility Conference Boston 1994

Housing Mobility Conference Chicago 1994

Housing Mobility Conference Cincinnati 1994

Housing Mobility Conference Chicago Scattered Sites 1994

Housing Mobility Conference Dallas 1994

Housing Mobility Conference Hartford 1990-1993

Housing Mobility Conference Omaha Scattered Sites 1994

Housing Mobility Conference March County 1994

Housing Mobility Conference Memphis 1994

Housing Mobility Conference Montgomery County circa 1988-1994

Housing Mobility Conference Mount Laurel 1988

Housing Mobility Conference New Castle 1994

Omaha HM Program 1994

Housing Mobility Conference san Francisco Bridge 1994

Yonkers ESOP 1994

Yonkers FHIO 1994

Housing Mobility Conference 1995

Yonkers FHIO 1994

“Housing Mobility: What Has It Accomplished and What Is Its Promise?” 1994

Report from the Second National Conference on Assisted Housing Mobility 1998

Series III. Chicago Freedom Movement, 1966-2006

Scope and Contents note

The Chicago Freedom Movement series contains materials from the 1966 Chicago Freedom Movement in Chicago led by Martin Luther King Jr. and Al Raby to end racial segregation in “a Northern city.” Williams was a member of the Chicago Freedom Movement Agenda Committee and the series includes programs and statements that expose the unfair housing market, the poor conditions of lower income housing, and other social and economic issues in Chicago. Also included in this series are materials pertaining to the Fulfilling the Dream 40th Anniversary Commemoration Conference of the Chicago Freedom Movement. The conference was a three-day event held at the Harold Washington Cultural Center in Bronzeville, a south side neighborhood of Chicago. The conference featured speeches and lectures by original members of the movement and an awards session to honor young activists.

Public relations 1966

Political action 1966-1967, undated

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement, 1966, 1983

“Open Housing Marches – Chicago Summer, 1966” Report by Mary Lou Findley, 1966

Chicago Freedom Movement history, 2004-2006

Martin Luther King, Jr., 1982, 1988-1989, undated

Commemoration Conference, 1994, 2003-2006

Series IV. Personal papers, 1959-2004

Scope and Contents note

The Personal papers series contains materials of a personal nature to Williams such as biographical sketches and newspaper clippings about Kale Williams. It includes contracted work from Roosevelt University’s Public Administration Program and the Ford Foundation; speeches and addresses, primarily on social issues, given by Williams from 1968-2004; fact sheets, court transcripts and exhibits from two class action suits, the Alliance to End Repression v. James Rochford and the American Civil Liberties Union v. the City of Chicago, wherein the Chicago Police Department was accused of spying on hundreds of thousands of private citizens and organizations, of which Williams was a plaintiff.

Chair in Applied Ethics at Loyola University Correspondence, 1994

Roosevelt University’s Public Administration Program Report, 1997

Ford Foundation grant assessments, 1978

Government surveillance litigation, 1959-1977

Speeches and presentations, circa 1968-2004

Newspaper clippings of Kale Williams, 1983-1984, 1991, undated

Series V. Subject files, 1964-1996

Scope and Contents note

The Subject files series is comprised of material collected by Williams such as reports, articles, and various newsletters. Most of the documents relate to Williams’s interest in civil rights and public housing.

Reports, 1973, 1983, 1987, 1992, 1993

“Personal View” by Al Raby, 1988

“Historical Overview: Equal Opportunity in Housing” by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 1973

“Ghettoization and Its Alternatives” by Gary Orfield, 1984

“A Policy Framework for Racial Justice” Joint Center for Political Studies, 1983

Bayard Rustin 75th birthday celebration, 1987

“Americans and The Emerging New World (Dis)Order: What Is To Be Done?” by John Martinson, 1993

“A New Era in Democracy: Democracy’s Third Wave” by Samuel P. Huntington, 1991

“Political Integrity and Its Critics” by Robert Pickus, 1965

Kale Williams’ notes undated

“Bob Woito: A Premature Memoir”- George Wiegal- Ethics and Public Policy Center, 1989

Quotations and excerpts from famous authors, undated

Loyola University, 1994, 1996

The Network Builder-The Chicago Rehab Network Newsletter, 1994

“Towards a National Poverty Strategy” by Al Raby and Stephen A. Perkins, undated

Coordinating Council of Community Organizations- Al Raby Notes, 1964, 1966, undated

Articles on Open Housing and the Chicago Freedom Movement, undated