The University of Chicago Library
History | Slave Trade (95 Volumes)
Slave Trade (95 Volumes)

The material relating to the slave trade presented to the British House of Commons in the nineteenth century provides comprehensive data on the practice of slavery, its extent and effects; on the capture, marketing, treatment and conditions of slaves in the various colonies and countries where slavery formed the basis of economic system; and on the increasing efforts of Great Britain and other countries to abolish the slave system.

The material relating to the slave trade falls into three general categories: major reports from Select Committees, classified correspondence from British Commissioners, agents and Foreign Powers (including reports from naval officers) and, finally, general reports, correspondence and papers. The subject list which follows contains all the papers relating specifically to slavery and the slave trade in each of these categories in the order given, published chronologically. Volume 8, consisting of Instructions issued to Naval Officers engaged in the suppression of the slave trade, an important policy record, is the exception to this arrangement.

Papers from the period covered which do not relate specifically to slavery but which contain some material on the subject, or which relate indirectly to slave trade (papers on the supply of Coolie and Indian labourers to the colonies) will be found in such subject sets as IUP Colonies-General (e.g. Vol 1), Africa (e.g. Vol 5), West Indies, East Indies, etc.

Slave Trade Volume 1

REPORTS FROM THE SELECT COMMITTEE ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1810 - 1830

240 pp 2 maps SBN 7165 0140 6

This volume contains four Select Committee Reports published between the years 1810 and 1830. There are two small reports on slave labour in the West India Colonies and the Mauritius. The main report which is that of 1830 examines the relations between white settlers the liberated Africans and the slaves in Sierra Leone and Fernando Po, principally with a view to bettering the condition and prospects of the liberated Africans.

Original references

1810-11 (225) II Free labourers from the East Sel. Cttee. Rep.

1826 (430) III Slave trade at the Mauritius Sel. Cttee. Rcp

1826-77 (90) Vl Slave trade at the Mauritius Sel. Cttee Mins. of Ev.

1830 (661 ) X State of Sierra Leone. Fernando Po. Sel. Cttee. Rep.,

Mins. of Ev.

Slave Trade V olume 2

REPORT FROM THE SELECT COMMITTEE ON THE EXTINCTION OF SLAVERY 1831-1832

660 pp SBN 7165 0141 4

The terms of reference of the committee of 1831-32 were the following: "to consider and report upon the measures which it may be expedient to adopt for the purpose of effecting the extinction of slavery throughout the British Dominions. at the earliest period compatible with the safety of all classes in the Colonies''. The Committee confined their inquiry to the island of Jamaica and sought to establish or refute two basic considerations: ''that the slaves, if emancipated, would maintain themselves, would be industrious and disposed to acquire property by labour; that the dangers of convulsion are greater from freedom withheld than from freedom granted to the slaves.''

Original reference

1831-32 (721) XX The extinction of slavery, Sel. Cttee. Rep., Mins. of Evidence.

Slave Trade Volume 3

REPORT FROM THE SELECT COMMITTEE ON THE APPRENTICESHIP SYSTEM IN THE COLONIES 1836-1837

736 pp

The Select Committee Report and Evidence of 1836, which forms the greater part of this volume concentrated on the system of apprenticeship in operation in Jamaica. This system which is described in the volume as one of preparation and transition, was calculated to expedite the momentous change from slavery to freedom. By the law of 1834 negroes under six years were made free and all others apprenticed for a given time to their former owners, technically no longer slaves but still tied to their masters. The committee found certain detects in the apprenticeship laws and made recommendations for their improvement. In general they reported that the laws were having the desired effect

Original references

1836 (500) XV Apprenticeship system in colonies. Sel. Cttee. Rep. Mins. of Ev.

1837 (510) VII Apprenticeship system in colonies. Sel.Cttee. Rep.

Slave Trade Volume 4

REPORTS FROM THE SELECT COMMITTEE ON THE SLAVE TRADE. 1847-1848

864 pp SBN 7165 0143 0

These reports deal with the effectiveness and shortcomings of British efforts to suppress the slave trade. The committee noted that. although the strength of the preventive naval force was at its highest, British cruisers liberated only four per cent of the slaves carried out of Africa. It was felt that the extent and activity of the slave traffic was governed by European demands for the products of slave labour. Other points covered by the inquiry included the problems of liberated Africans. the general welfare of slaves and efforts of the Brazilian government to suppress the trade.

Original references

1847-48 (272) ICXII Slave trade. Sell Cttee 1st Rep Mins. of Ev.

(366) Slave trade Sell Cttee. 2nd Rep Mins. of Ev.

(536) Slave trade. Sell Cttee. 3rd Rep Mins. of Ev.

(623) Slave trade. Sell Cttee. lth Rep Mins. of Ev.

Slave Trade Volume 5

REPORTS FROM THE SELECT COMMITTEE ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1849

244 pp 1 folding coloured map SBN 7165 0144 9

The two reports in this volume are a continuation, with the same terms of reference, of the inquiries of the 1847-48 Session. The ineffectiveness of the Naval effort and the power of vested interest is again highlighted. High ranking colonial officials. clergymen and naval officers are among those principally examined and the evidence shows in detail the progress of British policy at the time

Original references

1849 (308) XIX Slave trade. Sel. Cttee. 1st Rep.. Mins. of Ev..

(410) Slave trade. Sel. Cttee. :and Rep.. Mins. of Ev.

Slave Trade Volume 6

REPORTS FROM THE LORDS' SELECT COMMITTEE ON THE FINAL EXTINCTION OF THE AFRICAN SLAVE TRADE 1850

848 pp 1 folding plan and 4 folding coloured maps

These two highly important and comprehensive reports examine in detail the means adopted up to 1849 by Great Britain for the extinction of the African slave trade. The four principal means were: treaties with civilised states; treaties with Atrican chiefs; the maintenance of forts on the African coast; and the maintenance ot armed cruisers along the coast. Many recommendations. based on a great mass of evidence. are made for the more speedy and effective implementation of British policy.

Original references

1850 (53) IX Extinction of African slave trade.Sel.Cttee.H.L.Rep.

(590) Extinction of African slave trade.Sel.Cttee. H.L. Rep.

Slave Trade Volume 7

REPORT FROM THE SELECT COMMITTEE ON THE SLAVE TRADE. 1852-1871

544 pp 2 folding coloured maps SBN 7165 0146 5

The first report in this volume considers treaties and engagements between Great Britain, Spain and Portugal investigating the extent to which these countries have implemented the agreements, with special. regard to slave trade to Brazil and Cuba from Mozambique, Loanda and Angola. The report views the current terms of treaties, considers briefly the greatly reduced slave trade on the West Coast of Africa recommending the appointment of British agents in Spanish and Portuguese colonies while the Cuban slave market still flourished.

The second report considers the problems of abolishing the slave trade on the East African coast. being concerned principally with the Zanzibar and Kilwa slave markets, and the trade with Arabia, Persia and Madagascar.

Original references

1852-53 (920) XXXIX Slave trade treaties and engagements Sel.Cttee. Rep. Mins. of Ev.

1871 (420) Xll Slave trade. east coast of Africa, Sel. Cttee. Rep. Mins. of Ev.

Slave Trade Volume 8

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE GUIDANCE OF HER MAJESTY'S NAVAL OFFICERS EMPLOYED IN THE SUPPRESSION OF THE SLAVE TRADE TOGETHER WITH APPENDICES, 1844

576 pp SBN 7 1 65 0092 2

The instructions which are included in this paper are in eight sections. each section being directed to a certain category of ship, e g., ships employed in the suppression of the slave trade, ships whose officers negotiated with African chiefs, etc. In all cases the instructions relate to the conduct of the commanding officer in such situations as the bringing to of vessels, detention and adjudication, use of force, and so on. The remainder of the paper consists of copies of treaties and agreements ,ade between Great Britain and various other countries for the suppression of the slave trade.

Original reference

1844 (577) L Slave trade suppression, Naval Officers' instructions.

Classified Correspondence

Volumes 9 to 60 inclusive consist of classified correspondence relating to the Slave Trade. Generally. Class A contains correspondence with British Commissioners, Class B contains correspondence with Foreign Powers, Class C contains correspondence with Foreign Powers who were parties to conventions and Class D contains correspondence with Foreign Powers who were not parties to conventions.

This classification has variations. In the later years (1870-) Class A and B contain reports from naval officers (e.g. IUP Vol 52) whereas between 1849 and 1869, Class B consists of correspondence with British ministers and agents in foreign countries. This section also includes correspondence from British representatives and agents abroad with reports from naval officers which forms a class of its own not included in the A. B. C and D classification

Slave Trade Volume 9

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE. 1823 - 1824

636 pp SBN 7165 0466 9

In 1823 the first of a long series of classified correspondence with the Foreign Office relating to the slave trade was presented to Parliament. This volume contains that correspondence and the correspondence presented in 1824. It is noteworthy that the Anti-Slavery Society was also founded in 1823 and that a group of dedicated members were prominent parliamentarians--Wilberforce, Buxton and Whitmore. The material published here and in the succeeding volumes provides the official administrative and informatory papers on the extent and conditions of slavery and the slave trade, on the efforts to abolish it and on the measure of success, achieved.

Original references

1823 XIX Slave trade. correspondence. Ciass A, Class B.

1824 XXIV Slave uade. correspondence, Class A. Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 10

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1825 - 1826

616 pp SBN 7165 0467 7

The correspondence contained in this volume consists of detailed information on various aspects of the slave trade and British efforts to abolish it at Sierra Leone, the Havannah, Rio de Janeiro and Surinam as well as communications with European powers. The topics covered relate to slave vessels captured, legal developments connected with the slave trade, reports from Mixed Commission Courts, treaty negotiations, contraventions of treaties and the extent of the slave trade in particular areas. These papers reveal the gradual alignment of British policies with those of other colonial powers as a result ot British diplomacy and pressure.

Original references

1825 XXVII Slave trade, correspondence, Class A, Class B.

1826 XXIX Slave trade, correspondence, Class A. Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 11

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1826 - 1828

664 pp SBN 7165 0468 5

British efforts to curb slave trading in the Caribbean and South America are recorded in this correspondence. Of special interest are the diplomatic exchanges between Portugal and Britain in 1826 with Britain demanding total acceptance of the Abolition Act now that the Brazilian colonies had obtained independence. The provinces of Brazil remained open to slave dealing after the Congress of Vienna and on this basis Portugal had justified her participation in the slave trade. There is also correspondence relating to Cuba, Denmark, Dutch Guiana, Haiti, Sweden and the United States.

Orginal references

1826-27 XXVI Slave trade, correspondence, Class A. Class B.

1828 (542) XXVI Slave trade. correspondence. Class A. Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 12

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE 1829 - 1831

672 pp SBN 7165 0469 3

This volume contains a large number of reports on court inquiries held to investigate suspected breaches of the anti-slavery laws and treaties; despatches from commanders of British squadrons reporting their activities; information and statistics on slave ships, particularly in relation to traffic to Cuba; and negotiations with Brazilian authorities on Brazil's proposal to prolong the deadline for the abolition of the trade. One of the problems raised is that of preventing British subjects from being induced by high wages to man slave vessels.

Original references

1829 XXVI Slave trade correspondence. Class A. Class B.

1831 XIX Slave trade. correspondence. Class A. Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 13

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE. 1831-34

680 pp

In 1833. Viscount Palmerston. writing to H U Addington, Britain's chief negotiator and plenipotentiary in Spain from 1829 to 1833, spoke of the efforts "to induce Spain to perform her engagements to put an end to the slave-trade''as ''utterly unavailing''. The renewed and sustained efforts of Britain to persuade Spain to align her practice with her policies are evident here. There is further correspondence with other colonial powers and with British agents in the colonies on the slave trade.

Original references

1831-32 XLVII Slave trade. correspondence. Class A. Class B.

1833 XLIII Slate trade. correspondence. Class A. Class B.

1834 (471) XLIV Slave trade. correspondence. Class A. Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 14

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1835 - 1836

776 pp

Abstracts of the proceedings of international courts on slave matters and detailed reports on individual inquiries are enclosed with the correspondence from British Commissioners for these years. Details are provided on the conditions of emancipated negroes and the Commissioners are kept up to date with legislative and policy developments in Britain. One of the problems discussed is the jurisdiction of the international courts. A significant piece of correspondence reveals attempts to get the United States of America to accede to the anti-slavery treaties.

Original references

1835 LI Slave trade, correspondence. Class A. Class B.

1836 L Slave trade, correspondence. Class A. Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 15

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1837 - 1838

1064 pp

During 1836 United States vessels engaged openly in the slave trade for the first time despite the stringent Federal laws against importing slaves. This volume contains Palmerston's correspondence with the United States on this subject in which he informs Washington of the growing involvement of American ships in the slave trade and urges that greater efforts be made to eradicate the trade. The volume also contains correspondence between Dutch, Spanish and Portguese authorities and the British Government.

Original references

133- LIV Slave trade, correspondence. Class A. Class B.

1837-38 L Slave trade, correspondence. Class A. Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 16

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1839

672 pp

The correspondence here deals with many aspects of the slave trade. Of special interest are the papers relating to a proposed treaty with Portugal for cooperation in the suppression of slavery. Portugal in 1839 was the last European power to oppose the slave trade. The volume contains correspondence dealing with the suppression of slavery received from the Dutch and Swedish Governments as well as reports on the state of the slave trade from colonial authorities.

Original references

1839 XLVIII Slave trade, correspodence. Class A. Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 17

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE. 1839

472 pp SBN 7165 0474 X

The correspondence with British Commissioners and Foreign Powers for 1839 covers many facets of the British endeavour to suppress the slave trade. It includes treaty negotiations, particularly with South American countries, accounts of British attempts to ensure the maximum effectiveness of treaties, information on the extent of the slave trade with accounts of the trials of slavers. The correspondence reveals an intensified sense of urgency for action against the slave traders

Original reference

1839 XLIX Slave trade, correspondence. Classes A. B. C and D.

Slave Trade Volume 18

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE. 1840

840 pp SBN 7165 0475 8

The text of a treaty between Britain and Portugal for the abolition of the slave trade is contained in this volume along with correspondence received from British Commissioners charging Portugal with violation of the treaty. Portugal appealed to the great powers (who chose to ignore the appeal) for support against British anti-slavery measures. Palmerston's diplomacy secured a settlement of the dispute with Portugal on terms favourable to Britain and as a result Portugal took a more active part in the anti-slavery campaign.

Original reference.

1840 XLVI Slave trade, correspondence, Class A, Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 19

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1840

544 pp

One of the important documents in this volume is a Papal letter condemning the trade which, on the instructions of Viscount Palmerston, was circularised by the British Government and published in South America, the West Indies, Portugal, etc. Treaty negotiations and agreements, the enforcement of legislation and the use of national flags by slave ships are among the topics discussed in the correspondence.

Original reference

1840 XLVII Slave trade, correspondence, Classes B, C and D.

Slave Trade Volume 20

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1841

856 pp SBN 716504537

Of particular interest in this volume is the series of correspondence between the consular offices of the Brazilian provinces and Viscount Palmerston on the extent of slavery in Brazil, the Law of November 1831 (declaring all illegally imported Africans unconditionally free) and the effectiveness of anti-slave trade treaties. The letter of Pope Gregory XVI on the slave trade (see IUP volume Slave Trade 19) is the subject of widespread comment. There is also correspondence from the United States, Texas, Mexico, Russia (relating to the draft of a general convention on the slave trade) and other countries.

Original references

1841 [330] XXX Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

[331] Slave trade, correspondence Class B.

[332] Slave trade, correspondence Class C.

[333] Slave trade, correspondence, Class D.

Slave Trade Volume 21

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1842

912 pp SBN 716507501

The correspondence from the British Commissioners at Sierra Leone, Havana, Rio de Janeiro and Surinam contains detailed reports from the Mixed Commission Courts of slavers captured, tried and sentenced. These reports provide a valuable insight into the methods used by slave traders to evade the law. The correspondence with Foreign Powers derives mainly from Austria, Denmark, France, Hanse Towns, Prussia and Russia.

Original references

1842 [402] XLII Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

1842 [404] XLIV Slave trade, correspondence, Class C.

[405] Slave trade, correspondence, Class D.

Slave Trade Volume 22

CORRESPONDENCE WITH FOREIGN POWERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1842

856 pp SBN 7165 0751 X

This correspondence deals mainly with the Brazilian, Spanish and Portuguese slave trades. The British Government and its representatives in Africa and South America continued their efforts to suppress the slave trade. Reports of naval actions against slavers as well as details of the state of the slave trade and conditions under which slaves lived in Portuguese territories and in Cuba are given. Included also is correspondence relating to a treaty with the Argentine for the abolition of the slave trade in the Argentine Confederation.

Original reference

1842 [403] XLIII Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 23

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1843

856 pp SBN 7165 0752 8

One of the interesting documents enclosed with the correspondence from Montevideo published here is a detailed report on proposals made to the Uruguay Government for the importation of 600 African labourers. The paper raises the problem of the jurisdiction of Mixed Commission Courts. Correspondence relating to treaties with South American countries, the extent of the slave trade, slavery in Cuba and other related aspects of the trade is also included.

Original references

1843 [482] LVIII Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

[483] Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 24

CORRESPONDENCE WITH FOREIGN POWERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1843

648 pp SBN 7165 0753 6

Among these papers are some relating to the "Creole" case, which caused a serious dispute between the United States and Britain. The "Creole", an American ship, was brought into the port of Nassau in the Bahamas by her mutinous crew of negro slaves. The British authorities refused to hand over the slaves to the United States authorities for trial. Correspondence with France and the Trucial States on the subject of the slave trade and its prevention is also included.

Original references

1843 [484] LIX Slave trade, correspondence, Class C.

[485] Slave trade, correspondence, Class D.

Slave Trade Volume 25

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1844

696 pp 2 maps (1 folding coloured) SBN 7165 0754 4

The eradication of slavery in Africa and South America is dealt with in this volume. Details are given of the slave trade at Surinam, Brazil and Cuba. Estimates of the number of slaves brought to these countries are provided along with agreements with foreign states and diplomatic correspondence with the United States on the condition of slaves in that country.

Original references

1844 [573] XLVIII Slave trade,correspondence, Class A.

[576] Slave trade, correspondence, Class D.

Slave Trade Volume 26

CORRESPONDENCE WITH FOREIGN POWERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1844

824 pp

Much of the correspondence for this period relates to the Brazilian slave trade. Brazil had officially outlawed slave importation in 1829 but slaves continued to be imported with the open connivance of government officials. Correspondence relating to the actions of Captain Denham of the Royal Navy in destroying stores of slave traders in Spanish Africa is also included. Denham's action resulted in the Navy being prevented from taking penal action against slavers' property, a restriction the Navy was able to avoid. There is some further correspondence with Texas, then an independent state, and with German and Italian states.

Original references

1844 [574] XLIX Slave trade, correspondence Class B.

[575] Slave trade, correspondence Class C.

Slave Trade Volume 27

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1845

536 pp SBN 7165 0756 0

These papers deal mainly with the Cuban slave trade. Monthly reports from the British representatives on the island indicate that the trade was in a flourishing state and that the Spanish authorities did little to prevent it. Reports from several other South American states are more hopeful. The volume contains the reports from British Commissioners in the Cape of Good Hope and in Surinam on their efforts to suppress the trade.

Original references

1845 [632] XLIX Slave trade correspondence Class A.

[635] Slave trade correspondence C!ass D.

Slave Trade Volume 28

CORRESPONDENCE WITH FOREIGN POWERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1845

792 pp SBN 7165 0757 9

This correspondence deals with negotiations with Foreign Powers who were parties to treaties with Britain for the suppression of the traffic in slaves. Spain, Portugal and Brazil agreed to try captured slavers before mixed tribunals; other countries returned the slavers to their countries of origin for trial.

Original references

1845 [633] L Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

[634] Slave trade, correspondence, Class C.

Slave Trade Volume 29

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1846

812pp SBN 7165 0758 7

British efforts to eliminate the traffic in slaves were not limited to naval actions alone. This volume gives details of expeditions against African chiefs who sold their subjects into slavery and tells of efforts to negotiate treaties with the chiefs for the prevention of slavery. The volume also gives details of British naval actions against the flourishing Brazilian trade.

Original reference

1846 [723] L Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

Slave Trade Volume 30

CORRESPONDENCE WITH FOREIGN POWERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1846

552 pp SBN 7165 0759 5

The enforcement of the anti-slave trade regulations in the Spanish colonies was the subject of a lively series of correspondence between Spanish and British authorities during 1844-45. This correspondence includes a copy of the Penal Law for the suppression of slave trade passed by the Cortes in 1845. The remaining correspondence relates to Portugal, the Netherlands and South American countries.

Original reference

1846 [724] Ll Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 31

CORRESPONDENCE WITH FOREIGN POWERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1846

440 pp SBN 7165 0760 9

Warrants issued by foreign governments to British naval vessels authorising them to detain their subjects if caught pursuing the slave trade are published with this correspondence. Some foreign governments objected to British interference with their shipping. The United States and French governments in correspondence contained in this volume complain of unwarranted activity by the British navy.

Original references

1846 [725] Ll Slave trade, correspondence, Class C.

[726] Slave trade, correspondence, Class D.

Slave Trade Volume 32

CORRESPONDENCE WITH FOREIGN POWERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1847

416 pp SBN 7165 0761 7

The proceedings of the Court of Vice Admiralty at St Helena are contained in this volume along with reports from naval officers of actions taken against slavers. Many of the slavers caught in the Atlantic were taken to St Helena for trial and the court records provide an account of British naval action. Correspondence with British Commissioners in Africa and South America on the suppression of slavery is included.

Original reference

1847 [854] LXVII Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

Slave Trade Volume 33

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1847

600 pp SBN 7165 0762 5

Brazil withdrew from the Mixed Commission for-the eradication of the slave trade in 1846. Immediate British efforts to negotiate a new treaty failed. Extensive correspondence dealing with efforts to get more European countries to act against slavery is included.

Original references

1847 [855] LXVI Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

[856] Slave trade, correspondence,. Class C.

[857] Slave trade, correspondence, Class D.

Slave Trade Volume 34

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND FOREIGN POWERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1847 - 1848

432 pp SBN 7165 0763 3

The proceedings of the Court of Vice Admiralty at Sierra Leone along with reports from British Commissioners in Africa and South America are published here. The Court of Sierra Leone dealt with slavers captured by the Royal Navy in the North Atlantic. The methods used by the Navy to capture the slavers are described as well as conditions aboard the slave ships.

Original references

1847-48 [975] LXIV Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

[977] Slave trade, correspondence, Class C.

Slave Trade Volume 35

CORRESPONDENCE WITH FOREIGN POWERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1847-1848

520 pp SBN 7165 0764 1

The Portuguese were for long reluctant to take an active part in the anti-slavery campaign. British pressure eventually succeeded. The Portuguese began to capture slavers and to try their owners. This led to difficulties between the Portuguese and their former colony Brazil which objected to interference with the trade. The British Government's views on the Brazilian slave trade, on Portuguese efforts to prevent it, on importation of slaves to the United States are documented here.

Original references

1847-48 [976] LXIV Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

[978] Slave trade, correspondence, Class D.

Slave Trade Volume 36

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND BRITISH MINISTERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1849

712pp SBN 7165 0765 X

This volume contains vivid accounts of naval officers of the capture of slave ships and reports of the proceedings of the Courts of Vice Admiralty which tried captured slavers. Much of the material deals with the Brazilian slave trade as the government of Brazil still refused to play an active part in the international anti-slavery campaign.

Original references

1849 [1127] LV Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

[1128] Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 37

TRADE, 1850 CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND BRITISH MINISTERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE

792 pp SBN 7165 0766 8

Proceedings of the Vice Admiralty Courts at St Helena, British Guiana, the Cape of Good Hope and reports from naval officers actively involved in the suppression of the slave trade form a very important and informative section of this volume. The naval officers' reports give valuable accounts of negotiations and treaties concluded with African chiefs in addition to details of naval actions against slave traders.

Original references

1850 [1290] LV Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

[1291] Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 38

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1851

448 pp 1 map SBN 7165 0767 6

The United States Navy begins to play its part in the campaign to eradicate the Brazilian slave trade sending a squadron to patrol the Brazilian coast. At first the navy's action was ambivalent, it captured slavers but also prevented British naval vessels from searching United States ships suspected of being engaged in the trade.

Original reference

1851 [1424] Part I LVI Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

Slave Trade Volume 39

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH MINISTERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1851

480 pp SBN 7165 0768 4

Negotiations with African chiefs on the slave coast in an effort to stop the slave trade at its source as well as papers dealing with the strong anti-slavery campaign introduced by the Portuguese authorities are dealt with. Details of the extent of the slave trade in North Africa, reports on the Brazilian slave trade and American notes to Britain objecting to the searching of American vessels by British warships are included.

Original reference

1851 [1424-II] Part II LVI Slave trade. correspondence. Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 40

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND BRITISH MINISTERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1854

1104pp SBN 7165 0769 2

This volume contains correspondence between British Commissioners, local authorities, and the British Govemment. The Cuban slave trade continued to exist despite the efforts of the Spanish authorities to suppress it. The British Government urged the Portuguese authorities to take more positive action against the export of slaves from Loanda. Papers dealing with these affairs along with correspondence urging foreign governments to be more active in the anti-slavery movement are presented here.

Original references

1854 (0.6) LXXIII Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

(0.7) Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 41

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND BRITISH MINISTERS ON THE SLAVF TRADE, 1854 - 1855

912pp SBN 7165 0770 6

The success of the United States naval campaign dismayed many southern slave owners who began a campaign for the withdrawal of the squadron, a move which the "Free States" disapproved of. This volume includes correspondence between Washington and London on this subject as well as reports from British Commissioners and naval officers engaged in the suppression of the slave trade.

Original references

1854-55 (0.3) LVI Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

(0.4) Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 42

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND BRITISH MINISTERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1856

664 pp SBN 7165 0771 4

Most of the correspondence in this volume deals with the Cuban slave trade. The number of slaves imported into that country tended to vary with the effectiveness of the Governor. The British measures had led plantation owners to seek alternative supplies of slaves. Indentured Chinese and enslaved Yucatan Indians were now being brought to the island. The volume also contains reports from Dr David Livingstone, the famous explorer, of his journeys in Eastern Africa and of conditions prevailing in Central Africa before the coming of the white man.

Original references

1856 (0.1) LXll Slave trade. correspondence Class A. (0.2) Slave trade, correspondence Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 43

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND BRITISH MINISTERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1857

744 pp SBN 7165 0772 2

Dr Livingstone's report of his journey across the African continent is contained in this volume. Other correspondence deals with the Cuban and North African slave trades, including dispatches to the Spanish Government urging it to appoint efficient governors in Cuba. The volume contains the proceedings of the trial of two slavers caught by the United States authorities and tried in Baltimore on charges of importing slaves.

Original references

1857 [2281] XLIV Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

Sess 2

[2282] Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 44

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND BRITISH MINISTERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1857 - 1858

680 pp SBN 7165 0773 0

The temporary absence-of the United States squadron on patrol off Africa led to an increase in the slave trade. British warships were reluctant to search vessels registered in the United States and as a result most slave ships flew the United States flag. The British Government urged the return of the squadron whereas the representatives of the slave states opposed this.

Original references

1857-58 [2443] LXI Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

[2443-1] Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 45

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND BRITISH MINISTERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1859

608 pp SBN 7165 0774 9

The British Government's views on French efforts to recruit negro labourers in West Africa, a scheme Britain felt was slave trading under another name, are outlined here. Correspondence from British diplomatic representatives in the United States tells of the reluctance of the authorities in the southern states to cooperate with the Federal Government in the suppression of slavery. Reports from British Commissioners and naval officers in Africa are also included.

Original references

1859 [2569] XXXIV* Slave trade,correspondence,ClassA.

Sess 2 [2569-I] Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

* The original Index reference XXIV is incorrect and should read as here, XXXIV.

Slave Trade Volume 46

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND BRITISH MINISTERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1860

472 pp SBN 716507757

The reports from British Commissioners contained in this volume note a considerable increase in the Cuban and Loanda slave trades. Much of the trade was carried on by United States vessels despite stringent Federal laws. The British Government raised this matter with the Federal authorities who agreed to increase their naval strength in African waters. Reports and correspondence relative to these events along with reports from Commissioners and diplomatic correspondence on the slave trade are given in this volume.

Original references

1860 [2749] LXX Slave trade,correspondence,ClassB.

[2749-I] Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

Slave Trade Volume 47

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND BRITISH MINISTERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1861 - 1862

628 pp SBN 7165 0776 5

Lincoln's election put a new determination into United States campaign against slavery. Cooperation between the American and British Navies was possible on a scale never before contemplated. The United States Government was reluctant to participate in a proposed international conference for the suppression of slavery prefering to retain its traditional isolationist policy in world affairs. Britain's efforts to stop the export of slaves from Africa led to the occupation of Lagos as a base for their anti-slavery campaign in Africa.

Original references

1861 [2823] LXIV Slave trade, correspondence. Class A.

[2823-I] Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

1862 [2958] LXI Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

[2959] Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 48

THE CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH COMMISSIONERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1863

544 pp i folding coloured map SBN 7165 0777 3

This correspondence includes an agreement between the United States and United Kingdom to extend the area covered by the existing treaty for the suppression of the slave trade. Reports from British naval officers engaged in the suppression of the slave trade in Africa give details of slave ships and conditions prevailing on the slave coast.

Original references

1863 [3159] LXXI Slave trade correspondence,ClassA.

[3160] Slave trade correspondence, Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 49

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND BRITISH MINISTERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1864-1865

872 pp SBN 7165 0778 1

Cuba was now the only slave market in the Western World. The Spanish authorities had outlawed slavery but were reluctant to enforce the anti-slavery laws. The Spanish Government decided to make a determined effort to end the Cuban slave trade and appointed Dulce as Governor of Cuba. Dulce's efforts are discussed here along with reports from the British representative in Cuba during this period.

Original references

1864 [3339] LXVI Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

[3339-1] Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

1865 [3503] LVI Slave trade.-correspondence, Class A.

[3503-1] Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 50

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS AND BRITISH MINISTERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1866 - 1867

678 pp SBN 7165 0779 X

The ending of the American Civil War enabled the United States once again to take an active part in the campaign against slavery. A naval squadron was sent to the west coast of Africa to aid British naval units in the area. Direct British intervention in native African affairs in an effort to stop the trade at its source continued. Typical of reports from naval officers on this subject are Commodore Wilmot's reports that he had "Fined King Pepple 20 puncheons of oil for refusing to attend friendly Palaver" and his report that the King of Dahomey wished to send an ambassador to England.

Original references

1866 [3635] LXXV Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

[3635-I] Slave trade, correspondence. Class B.

1866 [3816] LXXIII Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

13816-I] Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 51

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE BRITISH COMMISSIONERS ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1867 - 1869

386 pp SBN 7165 0780 3

By 1869 the West African slave trade had been gteatly reduced. The Cuban and American trades had virtually ceased. The papers in this volume deal mainly with the increasing slave trade in East Africa which was conducted largely by Arabs. Since this trade was largely conducted by land and not by sea as the West African trade was, expeditions were sent into the interior to learn of the conditions prevailing there. Also included in this volume are reports dealing with Dr Livingstone's several expeditions into Africa.

Original references

1867-68 [4000] LXIV Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

[4000 I] Slave trade, correspondence Class B.

1868-69 [4131] LVI Slave trade, correspondence Class A.

[4131-I] Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

Slave Trade Volume 52

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH REPRESENTATIVES AND AGENTS ABROAD ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1870 - 1871

676 pp SBN 71650781 1

By 1869 the Atlantic slave trade had been virtually eliminated and attention turned to East Africa and the overland slave routes. The main burden of the campaign against slavery in the area fell on the resident British representatives in the region. Kirk, the most senior of these men, attempted to negotiate treaties with the Arab slavers, treaties which the Arabs seldom observed. This correspondence relates to these affairs and to the Atlantic slave trade. The volume also contains reports from Dr Livingstone of his adventures in the interior.

Original references

1870 . [C.140] LXI Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

[C.141] Slave trade, correspondence,ClassB.

[C.142] Slave trade, correspondence Class C

1871 [C.339] LXII Slave trade, correspondence Class A

[C.340] Slave trade, correspondence Class B.

[C.341] Slave trade, correspondence Class C.

Slave Trade Volume 53

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH REPRESENTATIVES AND AGENTS ABROAD ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1872 - 1874

476 pp SBN 7165 0782 X

The Zanzibar and East African slave trade is the principle subject dealt with in this volume. An account is given of Dr Kirk's efforts to persuade the Arabs to stop exporting slaves to the Middle East. Naval officers detail the capture of Arab dhows engaged in the trade. Details of Livingstone's journeys and of conditions prevailing amongst the native population of East Africa are also contained here.

Original references

1872[C.656] L IV Slave trade, correspondence, Class A.

[C 657] Slave trade, correspondence Class B.

1873[C.867] LXI Slave trade, correspondence Class A.

[C.867-1] Slave trade, correspondence, Class B.

1874[C. 1064] LXII Slave trade, reports, correspondence.

Slave Trade Volume 54

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH REPRESENTATIVES AND AGENTS ABROAD ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1875 - 1876

526 pp SBN 7165 0783 8

The state of the slave trade in East Africa is the main subject of this correspondence. The British Government sought the aid of the Portuguese and French authorities in the area for a joint campaign. Reports from naval officers detail their efforts to suppress the seaborne slave trade. British representatives tried continuously to negotiate treaties with the Arabs for the suppression of the overland route but their efforts were largely unavailing. An account of the death of Dr Livingstone is included.

Original references

1875 [C.1168] LXXI Slave trade, reports, correspondence.

1876 [C.1588] LXX Slave trade, reports, correspondence.

Slave Trade Yolume 55

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH REPRESENTATIVES AND AGENTS ABROAD ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1877

400 pp 3 folding maps SBN 7165 0784 6

The slave trades in Madagascar, Mozambique and Zanzibar are the principal subjects covered. The Portuguese and French authorities in the area opposed the trade in their colonies but the forces at their disposal were inadequate. The British Government sought and obtained from these countries increased naval forces for this purpose. Reports from British representatives in the area appear to indicate that the seaborne trade was now under control but that the overland trade largely continued.

Original reference

1877 [C.1829] LXXVIII Slave trade, reports, correspondence.

Slave Trade Volume 56

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH REPRESENTATIVES AND AGENTS ABROAD ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1878

472 pp SBN 7165 0785 4

Many negroes enslaved in East Africa were brought to Egypt. The British Government sought to stop this traffic which was largely conducted by means of the overland route. Through its influence with the Egyptian Government it obtained the appointment of Gordon as Governor of the Sudan. Gordon's appointment and his efforts to suppress the overland route, efforts which made him unpopular in Arab circles, the conditions of liberated slaves in Madagascar, Mozambique and Zanizibar and reports from naval officers and British commissioners are contained there.

Original reference

1878 [C.2139] LXVII Slave trade, reports, correspondence

Slave Trade Volume 57

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH REPRESENTATIVES AND AGENTS ABROAD ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1878 - 1880

700 pp SBN 7165 0786 2

The problem of indentured Chinese labourers in Cuba and the progress of the anti-slavery campaign in East Africa are the main features in this volume. Gordon met with increased opposition to his anti-slavery campaign in the Sudan. Catholic and Protestant missionaries set out for Uganda. British Commissioners report on the state of freed slaves and naval officers provide accounts of naval actions against slave ships.

Original references

1878-79 [C.2422] LXVI Slave trade. reports, correspondence. 1880 [C.2720] LXIX Slave trade.reports.correspondence.

Slave Trade Volume 58

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH REPRESENTATIVES AND AGENTS ABROAD ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1881

456 pp 4 folding coloured maps SBN 7165 0787 0

The British authorities secured the cooperation of the Sultan of Zanzibar in an anti-slavery campaign which proved to be highly successful. Britain urged Turkey to take stronger measures against the importation of slaves into the Ottoman Empire. Missionary societies became increasingly active in East Africa. Stanley explored the Belgian Congo. Reports and correspondence from British Commissioners and naval officers are also included here.

Original reference

1881 [C.3052] LXXXV Slave trade, reports, correspondence.

Slave Trade Volume 59

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH REPRESENTATIVES AND AGENTS ABROAD ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1882 - 1884

750 pp SBN 7165 0788 9

By 1882 most governments in the Middle East and East Africa had enacted laws against the slave trade. However, the trade still continued and slaves were now usually obtained from Central Africa by Arab raiding parties. European influence seldom extended far inland and information on the overland slave route comes largely from reports of explorers and missionaries. Papers dealing with the overland route together with reports from British Commissioners, naval officers-and diplomats are in this correspondence.

Original references

1882 [C.3160] LXV Slave trade, reports correspondence.

1883 [C.3547] LXVI Slave trade, reports correspondence.

1884 [C.3849] LXXV Slave trade, reports, correspondence.

Slave Trade Volume 60

CORRESPONDENCE WITH BRITISH REPRESENTATIVES AND AGENTS ABROAD, AND OTHER CORRESPONDENCE ON THE SLAVE TRADE, 1884-1889

836 pp SBN 7165 0789 7

Much of this correspondence deals with the slave trade in Turkey and North Africa. Turkey had outlawed slavery as had all the other governments in the area but their authority was weak and British influence could only succeed in getting decrees issued. Among reports included are some from Kitchener, then attached to the Egyptian Army. Papers dealing with the total emancipation of slaves in Brazil and its effect on the condition of the liberated slaves are included. The poverty prevailing among liberated slaves in East Africa with efforts of missionaries to aid them and French schemes to recruit African labour are documented.

Original references

1884-85 [C.4523] LXXIII Slave trade, reports, correspondence.

1886 [C.4776] LXII Slave trade, reports, correspondence.

1887 [C.5111] LXXVIII Slave trade, correspondence.

1888 [C.5428] XCIII Slave trade, correspondence.

1889[C.5821] LXXII Slave trade, correspondence.

Slave Trade Volume 61

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1801 - 1815

550 pp SBN 7165 0790 0

This volume, and those following, contain papers on slavery of a more general nature than the series of classified correspondence and the major reports in volumes 1 to 60. Among the papers in this volume are the Orders in Council prohibiting the importation of slaves issued between 1800 and 1815, papers on the insurrection of slaves at Dominica and Governor Ainsley's punishment of slaves. Other papers include the trial and execution of Arthur Hodge of Tortola for the murder of a negro slave, and returns of slave vessels and captured slaves, some correspondenoe on the abolition of slavery and the 1812 reports of the commissioners investigating the state of African settlements.

Original references

1801-2 (88) IV Slave trade vessels, account.

1803-4 (119) X Slave trade, papers.

1805 (39) X Abolition of Slave trade, correspondence.

1806 (84) Xll Importation of slaves, order in council.

1806 (265) XIII The African slave trade, accounts.

1810 (204) XIV Importation of slaves, order in council.

(353) Slave trade vessels, record.

1810-11 (203) Xl Protection of slaves,ordinance.

(204) Punishment of slaves, papers.

(254) Trial and execution of Arthur Hodge, papers.

1812 (101) X African settlements, Com. Reps.

(180) Slave trade, observations by William Dawes.

(30) The trial of Huggins, letters.

1812-13 (41) XIII Importation of slaves, order in council.

(50) Importation of slaves, order in council.

1813-14 (262) Xll Abolition of the slave trade, papers.

(289) Slave trade vessels, return.

(342) Slave trade vessels, return.

- (354) Captured negroes at Sierra Leone, papers.

(356) Recruitment of negro soldiers, papers.

1814-15 (277) Vll Punishment of slaves by Governor Ainsley, papers.

(303) Slave insurrection at Dominica, papers.

(356) Slave insurrection at Dominica, papers.

(327) Slave insurrection at Dominica, papers.

(368) Captured slaves, returns.

(455) .Importation of slaves, order in council.

1814-15 (455) XIII Importation of slaves. order in council.

Slave Trade Volume 62

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1816 - 1818

650 pp SBN 7165 0791 9

One of the most important papers on the subject of slave trade, and a starting point for research on this whole question, is the paper in this volume detailing all laws enacted in any of the British colonies, in America and the West Indies, on the importation, protection and good government of slaves or coloured people, since 1778, as well as a schedule of the colonial acts. A related paper deals with colonial acts and correspondence, with material on clergy, marriage, public worship and the maltreatment of slaves and negroes. Other papers relate to slavery in Dominica, Nevis and St Christopher's and to slave vessels.

Original references

1816 (5) XIX Runaway slaves in Dominica, papers.

(508) Poll-tax on slaves, titles of acts.

(226) Slaves, colonial laws.

1817 (338) XVII Slaves, colonial laws.

(477) Importation of slaves, order in council.

(491) Captured slaves, returns.

(492) Captured slaves, returns.

(501) I11-treatment of slaves, bills of indictment.

1818 (247) XVII Treatment of slaves, papers.

(251) Treatment of slaves, papers.

(374) Treatment of slaves, papers.

(433) Treatment of slaves, correspondence, colonial acts.

(20) Slave trade vessels, returns.

Slave Trade Volume 63

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1818 - 1821

736 pp SBN 7165 0792 7 -

The main paper in this volume is the detailed Order in Council prohibiting the importation of slaves, presented to parliament in 1821 and this is supplemented by four other papers from the 1818-1821 sessions, made up of treaties with foreign countries for the suppression of slave trade, papers on the execution of slave-trade treaties, on colonial slave laws and a despatch on slavery at Sierra Leone.

Original references

1818 XVIII Suppression of slavery, treaty.

1818 XVIII Suppression of slavery treaty.

1818 XVIII Suppression of slavery treaty.

.

Slave Trade Volume 64

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1821 - 1822

480 pp SBN 7165 0793 5

Seven of the papers here relate to the abolition of slave trade in the Mauritius. These consist of general papers, despatches and correspondence (including a copy of a report from the House of Representatives, United States of America) on means of suppressing the trade and on rights of search. One of the papers contains communications to the admiralty and instructions to naval officers; other papers relate to the capture of the French Ship "Sylphe" and to the Portuguese rig "Gaviao" and the Spanish "Anna Maria". The volume includes material on apprenticed negroes, captured slaves, slave importation and the British and Portuguese Mixed Commission.

Original references

1821 (61) XXIII Apprenticed negroes, papers.

(347) Importation of slaves, order in council.

(366) Importation of slaves, order in council.

(359) Restricting the slave trade, returns.

(589) Export of slaves. act.

(669) Abolition of slave trade in the Mauritius, papers.

1822 (103) XXII Abolition of slave trade in the Mauritius,papers.

(105) Abolition of slave trade in the Mauritius, papers.

(175) Abolition of slave trade in the Mauritius, papers.

(223) Abolition of slave trade in the Mauritius, papers.

(432) Abolition of slave trade in the Mauritius, papers.

(600) Abolition of slave trade in the Maurilius, papers.

(127) Vessels captured and condemned, return.

( 177) Captured slaves, returns.

(43) Restricting the slave trade, returnd.

(226) British and Portugese Mixed Commission, accounts.

Slave Trade Volume 65

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1823

608 pp 1 map SBN 7165 0794 3

This volume contains two further papers on the slave trade in the Mauritius (see volume 64 above). Three of the papers here relate to the condition of the slave population of the West Indies (Dominica Grenada, St Vincent, Barbados, Antigua, Tobago, Demerara, Berbice, St Christopher, Trinidad, Mauritius, Jamaica and the Bahamas). During this period, slavery in the West Indies was a matter of heated debate between the colonists and the anti-slavery party in Great Britain, one of whom was Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton. Among the other papers here is an interesting account of the proceedings of the Court of Criminal Justice in Berbice on the trial of a negro, Willem, for murder.

Original references

1823 (68) XVIII Colonial registries for slaves, acts.

(89) Slave population of West India colonies, papers.

(347) Slave population of West India colonies, papers.

(537) Slave population of West India colonies, papers.

(457) Slaves at Honduras, correspondence and papers.

1823 (544) XVIII Slave trade in the Mauritius, papers.

(556) Slave trade in the Mauritius, papers.

(348) Trials of slaves at Berbice, papers.

(469) Capture of the ship 'Regina'. papers.

Slave Trade Volume 66

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1823 - 1824

650 pp SBN 7165 0795 1

One of the papers in this volume deals with the amelioration of the slave conditions in the West Indies and documents the beginnings of this very important movement in the process of abolition, initiated in Parliament by Wilberforce, Buxton and :Bathurst, the colonial secretary. A further paper in this volume explains the measures adopted for the amelioration of slave conditions in the West Indies. The volume also contains three papers relating to the trial of Rev John Smith, a clergyman sentenced to death in connection with the negro rising in Demerara. The presentation of these papers to parliament marked a turning point in favour of the Abolitionists. There are other papers and correspondence on captured Africans, slave vessels and explanatory and additional articles on treaties.

Original references

1823 XIX Slave trade, correspondence and papers.

1823 XIX Explanatory and additional articles, treaties

1823 XIX Explanatory and additional articles,treaties.

1824 (158) XXIII Trial of John Smith,papers.

(333) Trial of John Smith,papers.

(338) Trial of John Smith,papers.

(160) Treatment of slaves,acts.

1824 (295) XXIV Suppression of slave trade, correspondece.

(389) Slaves captured and condemned,return.

(422) Slave trade, correspondence

(423) Maintenance of slaves, returns.

(424) Slaves in the West Indian colonies, papers.

(439) Slaves at Honduras, letter.

(442) Captured Africans, papers.

(425) Portugese ships,returns

(441) Portugese ships,returns.

1824 XXIV Condition od slaves, papers

1824 XXIV Slave trade,conventions.

Slave Trade Volume 66

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1825

992 pp 1 folding map SBN 7165 0796 X

This volume deals with numerous aspects of slavery and slave trade in the West India colonies. Manumission, government and returns of slave populations are among the topics examined, along with material on the Methodist missions and religious worship in these colonies. The volume includes the Commissioners' Reports on the state of Africans who had been condemned, apprenticed or otherwise disposed of in the West Indies, illustrated with a large coloured map. Correspondence between the Lords' Commissioners of the Admiralty and- naval officers on the suppression of the slave trade is also included:

Original references

1825 (66) XXV Slaves in the West India colonies, papers.

(74) Lescesne Escoffery, papers.

(113) Methodist missions, papers.

(127) Methodist missions, papers.

(310) Religious worship of slaves, papers.

(476) Complaints of masters and slaves, proceedings.

(114) Captured negroes, Com. Reps.

(115) Slave trade, correspondence.

(115-1) Slave trade, correspondence.

(166) Suppression of slave trade, correspondence.

(235) Slaves in Tortola, papers.

(244) Suppression of slave trade, correspondence.

(311) Suppression of slave trade, correspondence.

(361) Slave trade in the Mauritius, returns.

(362) Slaves captured and condemned.

(520) Sierra Leone, accounts.

(512) Slave population in West India colonies, papers.

Slave Trade Volume 68

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1825 - 1826

800 pp SBN 7165 0797 8

In 1824 Parliament was struggling with the problems of whether to enforce its regulations on the amelioration of the conditions of slaves on the various Colonial Assemblies or to let these Assemblies progress at their own pace. This volume contains two papers presented to parliament by command in explanation of the measures adopted by the-government for the amelioration of slave conditions in the West Indies and South America. There is also material on slavery in the Mauritius, Antigua, and Sierra Leone as well as a copy of all Acts passed by Colonial Legislatures since May 1823 on slaves.

Original references

1825 XXVI Traffic in slaves, treaty.

1825 XXVI Condition of slave population, papers.

1825 XXVII Condition of slave population, papers.

1826 (389) XXVI Liberated Africans, papers.

(400) Registrar of colonial slaves, returns.

(214) Acts respecting slaves, paper.

(333) Claim of Grace James, paper.

(351) Insubordination of slaves at Antigua, papers.

(401) Fiscals of Demerara and Berbice, proceedings.

(331) Slave trade at the Mauritius, correspondence.

(339) Slaves and registration of slaves, correspondence and order in council.

(379) Suppression of the slave trade, correspondence.

Slave Trade Volume 69

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1825

472 pp 2 maps (1 folding) SBN 7165 0798 6

This volume contains the second part of Major Moody's report on the state of captured, condemned and apprenticed negroes in the West Indies and copies of communications relating to the slave trade at the Mauritius, Bourbon and the Seychelles from 1811 to 1825. The remaining two papers in the volume provide a statement of the slave population in the Seychelles at the time of its capture and for each census taken afterwards.

Original references

1826 (81) XXVII Captured negroes,Major Moody's rep.

(295) Slave trade, communications.

(352) Slave trade, communications.

(175) Slave population in the Seychelles, return.

(341) Slave population in the Seychelles, return.

Slave Trade Volume 70

PAPERS RELATING TO SLAVE POPULATION IN THE WEST INDIES, 1826

776 pp SBN 7165 0799 4

This volume consists of a single sessional paper (353) of 1826, related to the slave population of the West Indies. Manumissions, returns of slaves, government, education and religion are among the topics treated.

Original reference

1826 (353) XXVIII The slave population in the West Indies, papers.

Slave Trade Volume 71

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1826 - 1827

594 pp SBN 7165 0800 1

The period 1823-1826 can be regarded as the period during which efforts were made through Parliament under pressure from Abolitionists and the Anti-Slavery Society to improve the general conditions of slaves in the colonies. This volume contains a further paper on this subject relating to slaves on the continent of South America. Also included among other papers are the Acts of the West India Legislatures on the same topic and a copy of Mr Lancelot Cooke's memorial on the state of prize slaves at the Cape of Good Hope along with the reports of the Commissioners of Inquiry into the truth of statements in the memorial. i

Original references

1826 XXIX Slaves in South America, papers.

1826 XXIX Slaves in South America, papers.

1826 XXIX Fiscals of Demerara and Berbice, proceedings.

1826 XXIX West India colonies, acts and papers.

1826-27 (42) XXI Memorial of Mr Lancelot Cooke with Com. Reps.

(202) Treatment of slaves at Cape of Good Hope, correspondence.

Slave Trade Volume 72

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1826 - 27

640 pp SBN 7165 0801 X

Four reports on the state and condition of captured negroes in -the islands of Antigua, Tortola, St Christopher, Nevis and Demerara were presented to Parliament in the 1826-27 session and are included in this volume. Other papers contain the Order in Council for the registration of slaves at the Mauritius, correspondence on slave trade from the governor of the Mauritius and slave returns from all the West India colonies.

Original references

1826-27 (111) XXII Slaves in the colonies, paper.

(146) Slaves in the colonies, paper.

1826-27 (128) XXII Slaves manumitted in each colony, return.

(129) Slaves in the West India colonies, returns.

(68) Slave trade in the Mauritius, correspondence.

(145)* Slave trade in the Mauritius, correspondence.

(236) Registration of slaves, order in council.

(285) Slaves in the Mauritius, return

(376) Slave trade in the Mauritius, correspondence.

(287) Prosecution of Chardin. paper.

(399) Sums paid as Bounties for slaves, return.

(355) Apprenticed Africans, rep.

(553) Apprenticed Africans, rep.

(462) Captured negroes, rep.

(463) Captured negroes, reps.

(464) Captured negroes, rep.

* The original Index reference reads (14) (5): this is incorrect and should read (145).

Slave Trade Volume 73

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1826 - 1827

688 pp 2 maps (1 folding coloured) SBN 7165 0802 8

Treaties and conventions between Great Britain and other countries for the abolition of the slave trade were made throughout the nineteenth century. This volume contains a copy of the 1826 convention with the Emperor of Brazil. Two further papers provide explanations of the measures adopted by the British government for the amelioration of the conditions of the slave population in in the West India possessions (see volumes 65, 66, 67, 68 and 71 above). One of the most interesting of the remaining papers here is paper (497) of 1826-27 which contains extracts from minutes of evidence taken by the Committee of the Council of Trinidad during their inquiry into the negro character.

Original references

1826 27 (465) XXIII Slaves in Trinidad, laws and regulations.

(497) The negro character, inquiry, Mins. of Ev.

1826 27 XXV Abolition of slave trade, convention.

1826-27 XXV Condition of slave population, papers.

1826-27 XXV Condition of slave population, papers.

1826 27 XXVI Condition of slave population, papers.

1826-27 XXVI Religious instruction,papers.

Slave Trade Volume 74

PAPERS RELATING TO SLAVERY IN INDIA, 1828

960 pp SBN 7165 0803 6

Slavery and slave trade in the territories under the rule of the East India Company was the subject of a long series of correspondence between the Court of Directors of the company and Company's governments in India. Included also are abstracts of regulations and proceedings by these governments on the slave trade, indicating when territories in which slavery exists came under the dominion of the company.

Original reference

1828 (125) XXIV Slavery in India, correspondence.

Slave Trade Volume 75

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1828

856 pp SB N 7165 0804 4

In 1828 general returns of slaves were made to Parliament for each year since 1821. These detailed returns relate to the West India colonies, the Isle of France and the Cape of Good Hope. They relate to slaves imported and exported, marriages of slaves and copies of marriage laws by which the sale of slave parents or children is unlawful and other related returns. Another paper relates to persons brought to trial tor slave dealing with the verdict and punishment inflicted. There are two reports in this volume, one on slaves at Tortola, the other from Commissioners for Legal Inquiry in the West Indies, on persons of Indian descent entitled to their freedom.

Original references

1828 (204) XXV Slavery in West India colonies. returns.

(205) Slavery in the Seychelles and Mauritius, returns.

(206) Slavery in the Seychelles and Mauritius, correspondence.

(207) Government of slaves, return.

(261) Barbice and Demerara Manumission, Mins. of Ev.

(147) Slavery at the Seychelles and Mauritius, returns.

(570) Slave population in West India colonies, returns.

1828 (522) XXVI Legal inquiry in the West Indies, Com. Rep.

(524) Slaves sold in Jamaica, return.

(297) Abolition of slave trade, correspondence.

(523) Act amending slave laws, letter.

(526) Slaves in the Mauritius, papers.

(366) Suppression of slave trade, correspondence.

(535) Captured negroes, reps. and papers.

Slave Trade Volume 76

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1828 - 1829

786 pp SB N 7165 0805 2

Further papers on the amelioration of the conditions of slaves in the British West India possessions, South America, the Cape of Good Hope and the Mauritius are included here (see volume 73 above). The state of slavery in the Mauritius is reported on by Commissioners of Inquiry who consider the employment, education, emancipation and conditions of slaves on the island. These volumes also contain information on the cruelty perpetrated by Henry and Helan Moss of Crooked Island, the Bahamas, on a female slave, with the minutes of evidence, the court sentence and correspondence.

Original references

1828 XXVII Condition of slave population, papers.

1829 (121) XXV Trial of E Moss, Mins. of Ev. and correspondence.

(275) Slaves captured in Sierra Leone, return.

(301) Manumission of slaves, order in council.

(336) Manumitted slaves, returns.

(292) Slave trade in the Mauritius, Com. of inquiry rep.

(337) 'The Anti-Slavery Reporter', correspondence.

(338) Slaves in the Mauritius, ordinances.

(355) Slave trade at the Mauritius, letter.

(237) Slave population in each colony, returns.

(333) Condition of slave population, papers.

(335) Protectors of slaves, reports

Slave Trade Volume 77

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1830 - 1831

576 pp SBN 7165 0806 0

This volume contains two further papers detailing by way of explanation the measures adopted by the British Government for the amelioration of the conditions of slaves. There is also material on apprenticed Africans and reports from the governors of slave colonies on the treatment of Africans condemned under Abolition Acts. The maltreatment of slaves is illustrated by papers relating to a slave named Henry Williams of Jamaica. Other papers relate to religious instruction, manumissions, claims to freedom and returns of the slave population in each colony.

Original references

1830 (672) XXI Religious instruction of slaves, papers.

(8) Condition of slaves, order in council.

(583) Claims to freedom, returns.

(676) Condition of slave population, papers.

(674) Slave population in the colonies, returns.

1830-31 (230) XVI Condition of slave population, papers.

(301) Slave laws, rep., correspondence.

(121) Slaves escheated to the crown, return.

(302) Manumissions, return.

(305) Slave population in the colonies, returns.

(231) Treatment of a female slave, despatches.

(91) Maltreatment of H Williams, communications.

1831 (304) XIX Treatment ofcondemnedAfricans,reps.

(101) Maltreatment of H Williams, communications.

(305) Emancipating the crown slaves, rep., orders.

Slave Trade Volume 78

PAPERS RELATING TO THE SLAVE TRADE, 1830 - 31

832 pp SBN 7165 0807 9

In 1830, the reports of the Protectors of Slaves in the colonies of Demerara, Berbice, Trinidad, St Lucia, the Cape of Good Hope and the Mauritius were presented to Parliament. These reports are published here together with the copies of the proceedings and decisions in each case of complaint between masters and slaves, whether they were terminated before the Protector of Slaves or referred to Colonial Magistrates, Public Officers or the Courts.

Original reference

1830-31 (262) XV* Protectors of slaves,reports.

* The original Index reference gives the wrong session year, 1830. The correct session is 1830-31.

Slave Trade Volume 79

PAPERS RELAT]NG TO SLAVERY, 1831 - 1832

650 pp SBN 7165 0808 7

This volume consists of four papers presented to Parliament in 1831-32 in explanation of the various measures adopted by the British Government to improve the living, working and social conditions of slaves in the British colonies, particularly in the West Indies, South America, the Cape of Good Hope and the Mauritius.

Original references

1831-32 XLVI Condition of the slave population, papers.

(279) Condition of the slave population, papers.

(649) Condition of the slave population, papers.

(733) Condition of the slave population, papers.

Slave Trade Volume 80

PAPERS RELATING TO SLAVERY, 1831 - 1834

664 pp SBN 7165 0809 5

By 1832 the slaves in Jamaica had become aware of the efforts of the colony's administration and colonists to retain slavery as a system. This culminated in a rebellion of slaves whicfi is the subject of three of the papers in this volume. Other papers deal with the questions of manumissions, escheated slaves, marriages, education and religious worship. The volume contains the Orders in Council relative to the abolition of slavery in Jamaica and papers on slavery in the East indies.

Original references

1831-32 (660) XLYII Slave population, returns.

(743) Apprenticed Africans, rep.

(739) Slave population, paper.

(561) Rebellion in Jamaica, rep.

(482) Rebellion in Jamaica, communications.

(285) Rebellion in Jamaica, correspondence and despatches.

(365) Manumissions in Jamaica, paper.

(738) Duty on slaves, despatch.

(480) Trial of George Aude, communications.

(737) Punishment of female slaves, correspondence.

(333) Slave registry, correspondence.

(364) Slave trade in Sierra Leone, paper.

1831-32 XLVIII Suppression of slave trade, convention.

1833(710) XXIV Captured slaves, returns.

1833 (C.52) XXVI Abolition of colonial slavery, resolutions.

(700) Slave population, reps.

(699) - Transportation of slaves, orders in council.

(542) Captured negroes and crown slaves, return.

(539) Registered slaves, return.

(541) Trial of H Williams, paper.

1833 XLIII Suppression of slave trade, convention.

1834 (128) XLIV Slavery in the East Indies, papers.

(152) 0 Abolition of slavery, orders in council.

Slave Trade Volume 81

PAPERS RELATING TO THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY, 1835

1120pp SBN 7165 0810 9

This volume continues the series of papers in explanation of the measures adopted by the government to give effect to the Abolition of Slavery Act and for the abolition of slavery throughout the British Colonies. These papers make up the main part of this volume but other papers on slavery here include Orders in Council, despatches from West India governors on fugitive slaves and copies of treaties for the abolition of the slave trade.

Original reference

1835 (177) L: Abolition of slavery act, papers.

(278-I) Abolition of slavery, papers.

(278-II) Abolition of slavery, papers.

(514) Abolition of slavery, order in council.

1835 (42) Ll Slave trade, orders in council.

(561) Slave trade, orders in council.

(253) Fugitive slaves. despatch.

(420) Population of slave colonies, returns.

(419) Special magistrates, paper.

(463) Compensation to slave owners contract.

(591) Compensation claimed, instructions.

1835 Ll Traffic in slaves, treaty article.

1835 Ll Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

1835Ll Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

Slave Trade Volume 82

PAPERS RELATING TO THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY, 1836

456 pp SBN 7165 0811 7

Two of the three papers which make up this volume deal with the abolition of slave trade and slavery in Jamaica and include the statements and protests of the agent in Jamaica regarding the actions and proceedings of the Governor and Assembly. The third paper explains (in continuation of previous papers, see volumes 76, 77, 79 and 81 above) the measures adopted by the British Government to improve slave conditions in the West Indies.

Original references

1836 (0.44) XLVIII Abolition of slavery,papers.

(174) Proceedings of Jamaican governor, statement.

(166 - 1) Part III 1 Abolition of slavery, papers.

Slave Trade Volume 83

PAPERS RELATING TO THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY, 1836

832 pp SBN 7165 0812 5

Compensation for the abolition of slavery in the West Indies is the subject of the first paper in this volume. The paper consists of returns, reports on a loan of [[sterling]]15 million for this purpose and details of provisions made. The 1836 Order in Council for Tobago is also included here along with a further important paper on the abolition of slavery in the West Indies.

Original references

1836 (597) XLIX West India compensation, return.

(572) Registrar of colonial slaves, paper.

(330) Abolition of slavery, order in council.

(115) Slavery abolition act, order in council.

(166 - 11) Part Ill 2 Slavery in the West India colonies, papers.

Slave Trade Volume 84

PAPERS RELATING TO THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY, 1836 37

680pp SBN 7165 0813 3

The principal paper in this volume deals ,with British measures for giving effect to the Slavery Abolition Act and relates to the Cape of Good Hope, Jamaica, British Guiana, the Mauritius, Antigua and the other West India colonies. A treaty between Britain and Spain and an additional article to the 1818 treaty with the Netherlands (see volume 63 above) are also included.

Original references

1836 L Abolition of slave trade, treaty.

1837 (521) LIII Abolition of slave trade, papers.

1837 LIV Prevention of slave traffic, treaty article.

Slave Trade Volume 85

PAPERS RELATING TO THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY, 1837 - 1838

600 pp 1 folding plan SBN 7165 0814 1

Jamaica, Barbados and British Guiana are the areas involved in the two papers in this volume on the abolition of the slave trade and slavery. The position of the slaves is delineated and the attitudes of the governments of the colonies reveal the reasons for the slave risings in Jamaica and the difficulties facing the abolitionists in persuading the settlers to adopt the system of apprenticeship and the eventual abolition of slavery.

Original references

1837-38 (154-I) XLIX Abolition ofslavery,papers.

(154-II) Abolition of slavery, papers.

Slave Trade Volume 86

PAPERS RELATING TO SLAVERY IN INDIA, 1837 - 1838

640 pp SBN 7165 0815 X

This volume consists of a single sessional paper, number (697) of 1837-38. It is made up of correspondence between the Directors of the East India Company and the company's representatives in India on the subject of slavery along with orders and regulations issued there, and proceedings undertaken. The paper also includes some communications on slavery on the island of Ceylon.

Original reference

1837-38 (697) LI Slavery in India and Ceylon, correspondence.

Slave Trade Volume 87

PAPERS RELATING TO THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY, 1837 - 1841

604 pp SBN 7165 0816 8

Seven of the papers in this volume consist of treaties, conventions and treaty negotiations for the more effective suppression of slave trade. Three further papers relate to the apprenticeship system, one of these being a memorial to the government on the system, the other two relating to measures adopted by the Legislatures of Jamaica, British Guiana, Dominica, Virgin Islands and other colonies for the abolition of the apprenticeship system. Compensation to slave owners, slave vessels, foreign slave trade (Jamaica), atrocities of slave traders and slave trade in Ceylon and at the Gallinas are subjects of other papers in this volume.

Original references

1837-38 (535) XLVIII Apprenticeship system, papers.

(727) Apprenticeship system, papers.

(27) Apprenticeship system, papers.

(64) Compensation to slave owners, paper.

(215) Compensation to slave owners, return.

1837-38 (200) LII Captured slave vessels,return.

(466) Captured slave vessels, return.

(494) Seizures of slaves, return.

1837-38 (533) LII Captured slave vessels, paper.

(688) Foreign slave trade, memorial.

(150) Soodan Blacks, correspondence.

[136] Suppression of slave trade, convention.

[117] Suppression of slave trade, convention.

[106] Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

1839 (162) XXXI Portuguese slave vessel,return.

1839 (467) XXXIX Slavery in Ceylon, despatch.

1839 (575) L Slave vessels captured, proceeds.

(554) Slave vessels captured, return.

(169) Slave vessels captured, applications and replies.

(157) Atrocities of slave traders, rep., Ev.

(335) Slave vessels, memorial.

1840 (-142) XXXIV Commissioners of Arbitration, return.

1840 (622) XLVI Slave vessels, returns.

1840 [214] XLVIII Suppression of slave trade, papers.

[231] Abolition of slave trade, treaty.

1841 (277) XIV Slave vessels, proceeds.

1841 [290] XXXI Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

[291] Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

[300] Slave trade at the Gallinas, correspondence.

1841 (54) III Slavery in the East Indies. Ietter.

Sess 2

Slave Trade Volume 88

PAPERS RELATING TO SLAVERY IN THE EAST INDIES, 1841

888 pp SBN 7165 0817 6

The two papers from the 1841 session of parliament which make up this volume consist of papers and despatches on the subject of slavery in the East Indies. They include a despatch from the Governor-General of India in Council to the court of directors of the East India Company and the report from the Indian Law Commissioners, with appendix, on the same subject.

Original references

1841 (238) XXVIII Slavery in the East Indies, papers.

(262) Slavery in the East Indies, Com. Rep., despatch.

Slave Trade Volume 89

PAPERS RELATING TO SLAVERY, 1842 - 1848

600 pp SBN 7165 0818 4

Twelve of the papers here are copies of treaties between Great Britain and foreign countries (Austria, France, Prussia, Russia, Bolivia, Mexico, Texas, Portugal, Uruguay, Chile, etc.) for the abolition of traffic in slaves and the suppression of the African slave trade. Slavery in Texas, Ceylon and the East Indies, and data on compensation, slave vessels and government ships are the subjects of other papers included here.

Original references

1842 (385) XLIV Slave vessels, returns.

(561) Slave vessels, returns.

(426) Commission established under treaties, returns.

- (539) Slave vessels, returns.

1842 [363] XLV Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

[417] Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

[407] Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

[414] Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

1395] Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

[391] Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

1843 (568) LVIII SlaveryinCeylon, correspondence.

(525) Slavery in the East Indies, despatch.

(363) Ships of war employed, return.

1843 [452] LXI Abolition of traffic in slaves, treaty.

[453] Abolition of traffic in slaves, treaty.

[425] Abolition of traffic in slaves, treaty article.

1844 (14) XXXVI East India Company, despatch.

1845 (212) XLIX Slavery in America, returns.

(416) Warrants for French cruisers, return.

[655] Convention on slave trade. papers.

(73) Slave vessels, returns.

(471) Slave vessels, returns.

(609) Vessels in Her Majesty's service, return.

1845 [630] Lll Suppression of slavery, treaty.

1846 (670) L Ships of war employed, returns.

1847 [851] LXVII Duke de Broglie and Hon Stephen Lushington, Min.of Ev.

(609) Sale of slave ships, papers.

(653) Sale of slave ships, returns,

(625) Vice-Admiralty courts, return.

1847-48 (116) LXIV Slaves captured, return.

(231) Vessels captured, return.

[970] The chiefs of the Bonny, papers.

(133) Ships of war employed, return.

(179) Deaths in Her Majesty's vessels, returns.

[885] Abolition of slave trade, treaty.

(161) Portuguese slave vessels, paper.

(682) Vessels adjudicated upon, return.

(136) Abolition of slave trade, correspondence.

Slave Trade Volume 90

PAPERS RELATING TO THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY, 1849 - 1859

650 pp 1 folding map SBN 7165 0819 2

This volume deals with the suppression of the slave trade and includes papers on treaties and conventions, on ships of war used for that purpose, on the reduction of Lagos by British forces and the destruction of the barracoons of Don Crispo. The rights of liberated Africans and the prevention of slave dealing at Sierra Leone, the Spanish decrees on slaves in Cuba, correspondence with the United States government on rights of search and the capture of the French slaver, the "Charles et Georges" are the subjects of other papers included here.

Original references.

1845 (3) XLIX Correspondence with Foreign Powers.

1849 (1013). LVI Suppression of the slave trade, treaty article.

(1091) Suppression of the slave trade, treaty.

1850 (149) LV Slave trade, memorials.

(151) Mortality aboard Her Majesty's ships, returns.

[1166] Vessels captured, return.

1852 (457) XXX H M Ships on west African coast, return.

(580) Ships employed on African coast, return.

1852 [1455] LIV The reduction of Lagos, papers.

[1442] Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

1852 (201) LV Slaves in Cuba and Brazil, returns.

1852-53 (752) LX Despatches from Commander Phillips.

1852-53 [1680] LXV Liberated Africans and slave dealing, papers.

1852-53 (5) Cll Negro slaves in Brazil and Cuba, returns.

1854 (201) XLII Slave vessels, returns.

(401) Slave vessels, returns.

(61) Liberation of slaves, returns.

1854 [1784] LXXII Slavery in Cuba, decrees.

1854-55 (406) LVI Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

1856 (0.13) LXII Slave trade,Brazil,correspondence.

1857 (91) XXVII H M ships employed, return.

Sess 2

1857-58 [2446] XXXIX U S government on right of visit, correspondence.

1857-58 (410) LXI H M ships employed, return.

(454) H M ships employed, return.

1859 (28) XXVII Appeal of Hocquard v the Queen, papers.

Sess I

[2455] Settlement of outstanding claims, convention.

[2468] The 'Charles et Georges' correspondence.

[2488] The 'Charles et Georges' papers.

1859 (67) XXVII Appeal of Hocquard v the Queen, papers.

Sess 2

Slave Trade Volume 91

PAPERS RELATING TO THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY, 1861 -1874

540 pp 4 coloured maps (2 folding) SBN 67165 0820

During the period covered by the papers in this volume, the American civil war was in progress and efforts to involve the United States in slave trade treaties were being made by Britain. The 1862 treaty on the African Slave trade with the United States is included here. Slavery in Cuba had grown to large proportions again and this is the subject of papers in this period. There are five very important papers on the East African slave trade consisting of reports and correspondence illustrated with coloured maps. Other papers relate to captured slave vessels, Mixed Commission Courts and treaties.

Original references

1861 (539) XL The wreck of a slaver, despatches.

1861 [2831] LXIV Cuba slave trade, despatch.

[2813] Fugitive slave, Anderson, correspondence.

(250) H M ships, returns.

(251) Captured slave vessels, returns.

1862[3064] XXXVI Mixed commission court, return.

1862 [2982] LXI Occupation of Lagos, papers.

[3003] Occupation of Lagos, papers.

[2988] Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

[3003] Occupation of Lagos, papers.

1863 [3129] LXXI Suppression of slave trade, treaty, article.

1863 - [3189] LXXIII Liberated slaves in Brazil, correspondence.

1865 [3500] LVI Captured slave vessels, returns

[3490] Mixed commission courts, returns.

1867 (300) LXXIII Slave vessels, return.

(374) Officers and men employed, return.

1867-68 (362) LXIV Slave vessels, returns.

(158) Ships employed, return.

1870 [C.209] LXI East African slave trade, rep.

(411) Slave vessels, return.

1870 [C. 193] LXIX Suppression of slave trade, convention.

1871 [C.385] LXII East African slave trade, correspondence.

1872 (174) LIV Slave vessels, return. ::

1872 [C.470] LXX Suppression of slave trade, convention.

1873 [C.820] LXI Sir Bartle Frere's mission, correspondence.

1874 [C.1065] XLII Emancipation of negroes, papers.

1874 [C.1007] XLVI Domestic slavery, despatches.

1874 [C.946] LXII East African slave trade, reps.

[C.1062] East African slave trade, reps.

[C.887] Abolition of slave trade, treaty.

[C.889] Abolition of slave trade, treaty.

[C.903] Protection of immigrants, engagement.

[C.904] Abolition of slave trade, engagement.

[C 985] Abolition of slave trade, engagement.

Slave Trade Volume 92

PAPERS RELATING TO THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY, 1875 - 1876

516 pp 4 coloured maps (2 folding) SBN 7165 0811 4

The principal paper in this volume is the report of the Commissioners appointed to inquire into and report upon the nature and extent of such international obligations as are applicable to questions on the reception of fugitive slaves by British ships in the territorial waters of foreign states. This was presented to Parliament in 1876 with the minutes of evidence, appendix and index. Other papers relate to British jurisdiction qn the Gold Coast and problems of slavery there and in Puerto Rico.

Original references

1875 [C. 1139] LII Abolition of slavery in Gold Coast, correspondence.

[C. 1140] Abolition of slavery in Gold Coast, correspondence.

[C. I 159] Abolition of slavery in Gold Coast, correspondence.

1875 [C.1215] LXXI Slavery in Puerto Rico, correspondence.

[C. 1236] Slavery in Puerto Rico, papers.

(326) Slave vessels captured, return.

1876 [C.1516 I] XXVIII International obligations, Com. Rep.

Slave Trade Volume 93

PAPERS RELATING TO THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY, 1876-1888

580 pp SBN 7165 0822 2

Chinese slavery in Hong Kong, reports from councils on slave conditions in Cuba, conventions with sultans and Eastern rulers, reports on the state of slave trade and slavery in Morocco and in Egypt (including a despatch on the subject from Sir E Baring), reports on the slave trade on the East Coast of Africa and other related topics are the principal areas covered by the papers in this volume.

Original references :

1876 (51) XL V Slaves rescued and fugitive slaves, return.

1876 [C.1413] LXX Fugitive slaves, correspondence.

[C.1480] Slaves in foreign countries, circulars.

[C. 1593] Fugitive slaves, instructions.

[C 1546] Slavcry in India, despatches.

[C. 152 1 ] Suppression of slave trade, communications.

1877 IC.1800] LXXVIII Fugitive slave, rep.

[C. 1862] Seizure of slaves, correspondence.

1878 [C.2148] LV Abolition of slavery rep.

i876 [C.1387] LXXXIV Supplementary treatjwithZanzibar,treaty.

1878 [C.1902] LXVII Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

C.2051] ~ Labour question in Cuba, rep.

[C.2140] . East Indies slave trade, annual rep.

1878 [C.1900] LXVll Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

1878-79 [C.2423] LXVI Slavery in Cuba, correspondence.

(381) Slaves and slave vessels captured, returns.

1880 [C.2702] LXIX Bombardment of Batanga, correspondence.

[C.2538] Bombardment of Onitsha, correspondence.

[C.2614] Slavery in Cuba, correspondence.

1880 [C.2477] LXXVIII Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

1881 [C.3060] C Suppression of slave trade, convention.

1882 [C.3185] XLV Chinese slavery in Hong Kong, correspondence.

1882 [C.3341] LXV Suppression of slave trade, convention.

[C.3397] Slaves in Cuba, rep.

1883 [C.3702] LXVI Suppression of slavery, convention'

[C.3590] ~ Suppression of slavery, amendment.

[C.3627] Slaves in Cuba, reps.

[C.3700] Slavery in Morocco, reps.

[C.3727] Suppression of slave trade, treaty,

1884 [C.4099] LXXV Suppression of slave trade, treaty.

[C.3935] Slavery in Egypt, despatch.

1884 85 [C.4239] LXXIII Convention with Egypt, correspondence.

1886 [C.4607] LXXIII Accession of Italy to convention, declaration.

1887 [C.4994] XCI Slavery in Egypt, correspondence

1888 [C.5578] LXXIV Slave trade, East Africa, reps.

[C.5559] Slave trade, East Africa, correspondence.

Slave Trade Volume 94

GENERAL ACT, DECLARATION AND PROTOCOLS OF THE BRUSSEL SLAVE TRADECONFERENCE, WITH ANNEXES TO THE PROTOCOLS, 1890

X62 pp SBN 7165 0823 0

Contains the papers (in French) emanating from the Brussels Slave Trade Conference, together with English translations of them.

Original references

1890 [c. 6048] L Brussels Slave Trade Conference, general act, annexed declaration.

c. 6049] Brussels Slave Trade Conference,

general act, annexed declaration, protocols.

lc. 6049- I] Brussels Slave Trade Conference, translation of general act, annexed declaration and protocols.

Slave Trade Volume 95

CORRESPONDENCE AND OTHER PAPERS RELATING TO TIIE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY, 1890- 1899

630 pp 1 folding coloured map and 1 plan SBN 7165 1317 X

Contains the miscellaneous correspondence and other papers on slavery from 1890 to 1899, including some further documents pertaining to the Brussels Conference.

Original references

1890 [c. 5901] LXXXI African slave trade, treaty between Great Britain and Italy, 1889.

1890-91 [c. 6354] LVII Slavery in the Gold Coast, correspondence.

c. 6373] East African slave trade, papers.

[c. 6211] Zanzibar slavery, decree.

1892[c. 6702] LXXIV Zanzibar slavery and slave trade, decree.

[c. 6699] Slave-raiding in Nyassaland, papers.

1892[c. 6557]XCV Brussels Slave Trade Conference, general act, protocols of subsequent conferences.

[c. 6592] African slave trade, treaty between Great Britain and Spain, 1890.

1893-94 [c. 7105] LXXXV Slave trade in Bengazi, paper.

[c. 7158] Slave trade in Bengazi, further papers.

[c. 70311 Slave-raiding in British Central Africa, papers.

[c. 7247]1 Slaves freed in Zanzibar waters, returns.

[c. 7035] Slave traffic in Zanzibar, paper;

1895[c. 7707]LXXI Slavery in Zanzibar, correspondence.

1895[c. 7594] CIX Brussels Slave Trade Conference, accession of the Orange Free State to the general act.

1896[c. 79251 LVIII Slave trade in British Central Africa, correspondence.

c. 8013] Slave trade in British Central Africa, further correspondence,

1896[c. 8275] LIX Slavery in Zanzibar, correspondence.

1896[c. 7929] XCVII Suppression of slavery and the slave trade, convention between Great Britain and Egypt, 1895.

[c. 8011] Suppression of slavery and the slave trade, convention between Great Britain and Egypt, 1895, annexes and decrees.

1897[c. 8394] LXII Abolition of slavery in Zanzibar and Pemba, instructions.

[c. 8433] Abolition of slavery in Zanzibar and Pemba, correspondence.

1898[c. 8858] LX Abolition of slavery in Zanzibar and Pemba, further correspondence.

1899[c. 9502]LXIII Slavery in East Africa, correspondence.